3 Dec
2019

Urea shortage hits sowing of rabi crop in Rajasthan

first_imgThe shortage of urea fertilizer in Kota and Baran districts of Rajasthan’s Hadoti region has created difficulties for the farmers sowing wheat, mustard, gram and other crops during the ongoing rabi season. Farmers have made long queues outside the distribution centres, while clashes between the agitating farmers and police were reported from Baran’s Chhipabarod and Relawan villages earlier this week.The fertilizer is not available in sufficient quantity even at the State government-run cooperative stores. Against the requirement of 3 lakh metric tonnes of urea in the region, only 1.39 lakh metric tonnes have been supplies so far, as the Agriculture Department’s officials have distributed slips to farmers for getting the urea bags at several police stations to maintain order.The district authorities have held the farmers’ habit of stockpiling of fertilisers responsible for the crunch. Baran Collector S.P. Singh said on Thursday that about 44,000 metric tonnes of urea had been distributed so far against the total allocation of 57,000 metric tonnes.‘Centre discriminating’Newly elected Congress MLA from Kota’s Sangod, Bharat Singh, said the Centre has started discriminating against Rajasthan by reducing the urea allocation because of the Congress being elected in the State Assembly polls. “The BJP wants to create a crisis situation, for which the farmers will blame the Congress government here. This tactic will backfire on them in next year’s Lok Sabha elections,” he said.Ironically, Kota is a major production centre for urea, as two hi-tech nitrogenous fertilizer plants of Chambal Fertilizers and Chemicals Limited (CFCL) are situated in the district. A large number of farmers have staged a dharna outside the CFCL plants with the demand that an adequate share in their daily production of 6,000 metric tonnes of urea be reserved for the local supply.Hadoti Kisan Union general secretary Dashrath Kumar told The Hindu that the demand for urea had increased in the current rabi season because of a higher sowing of wheat. ‘Withdraw condition’He said the CFCL should withdraw its necessary condition imposed on dealers for purchasing co-products along with the fertilizer and the urea should be distributed only at the cooperative stores.“Only an urgent provision of additional allocation for the Hadoti region by the Centre can improve the situation here. Farmers need an average of 20 to 30 urea bags each for their land holdings, but they are being given only 5 to 6 bags,” he said.last_img read more

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28 Sep
2019

Ohio State womens basketball blown out ousted from Sweet 16 by Tennessee

OSU senior guard Ameryst Alston (14) dribbles the ball during a game against Wagner on Nov. 22 at St. John Arena. Credit: Elizabeth Tzagournis | Lantern PhotographerThe last time the Tennessee and Ohio State women’s basketball teams met before Friday was in the 2011 NCAA Sweet 16 round. Fast forward five years to Friday night, and the two had a rematch in that very same rebound.The No. 7 seed Lady Vols were not the favorite coming into the matchup with the Buckeyes in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, but they disregarded the predictions from analysts and dominated the third-seeded Buckeyes 78-62.Tennessee came out of the gates strong and played with efficiency, taking quality shots from all areas of the court. Redshirt sophomore guard Diamond DeShields left the game for a stint with an injury, but would later return to contribute an all-around performance to the Lady Vols’ success.Tennessee took control of the contest in the first half by breaking the press with ease and using its height in the paint to its advantage.Tennessee’s post play was led by redshirt sophomore center Mercedes Russell who went a perfect 6-of-6 from the field, taking over the OSU forwards. The Springfield, Oregon, native showed poise on the block with her effortless post moves and displayed her clean shooting form, putting the ball through the nylon throughout the evening.Along with Russell’s success, senior forward Bashaara Graves also didn’t miss a shot in the first half, shooting 5-of-5.OSU, on the other hand, was far from perfect, struggling to get an offensive flow in the first 20 minutes of play. Only shooting 25 percent as a team in the first quarter, the Buckeyes had to find a solution to their offense if they wanted to keep it close going into the locker room.Missing their lead defender, senior guard Cait Craft, to a season-ending hand injury, the Buckeyes didn’t have a player to turn to shut down the Volunteers scorers.Senior guard Ameryst Alston, who has been struggling to perform because of a wrist injury suffered in the Big Ten tournament, did not want her senior year to end earlier than it had to be, ignoring the wrist pain and completing some of the acrobatic shots that she regularly converted before the injury.Sophomore guard Kelsey Mitchell took matters into her own hands for the rest of the first half, knocking down a slew of 3-pointers and finishing the half with 11 points.Even though OSU trailed after the first half of play, the Buckeyes did not show the urgency that they needed to catch up to the Lady Vols. OSU ignored the offensive strategy that it typically followed throughout the year and lacked energy on defense, putting the Scarlet and Gray in even more of a hole as the second half of play got underway.Tennessee’s offensive movement continued to be pristine and showed shades of coach Pat Summitt’s rosters back in the day. The Buckeyes simply had no answer for Tennessee and were unable to enforce their high-velocity pace that has been their go-to all season long.Russell would go on to score a game high 25 points and grab 14 rebounds, while Graves finished with 14 points and nine boards.Despite her injury, DeShields ended her night with 10 points and dished out seven assists, while grabbing five rebounds as well.On the Scarlet and Gray side, Alston led the Buckeyes with 21 points, ending her collegiate career on a strong note. Mitchell would follow her with 20 points, though she shot just 5-of-15 from the field.With the loss, the Buckeyes will board the plane back home to Columbus to begin their offseason, while the Lady Vols are set to continue to the Elite Eight to take on Syracuse and compete for a chance to make it to the Final Four. read more

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18 Sep
2019

Real Madrid monitor South American sensation Wilmar Barrios

first_imgBoca Juniors’ wonder Wilmar Barrios could soon be heading towards Europe, with Real Madrid lining up a shock January move for the Colombia internationalThe 25-year-old midfielder has been astonishing ever since he arrived at the Bombonera back in 2016. During his two-year spell with the Xeneizes, Barrios has lifted two Argentine Primera Division titles.Now, he is on his way of becoming the champions of the Copa Libertadores, as Boca comfortably cruising towards the big final.Jose Mourinho, Lionel MessiMourinho: “Lionel Messi made me a better coach” Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho believes the experience of going up against Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi at Real Madrid made him a greater coach.Although yet unfamiliar to a wider audience in Europe, the former Deportes Tolima man has already built a notable reputation in South America.Now, the Spanish Marca report that Real Madrid prepare to make a January bid for Barrios, as Casemiro and Modric both struggle to rediscover their last season form.With Toni Kross and the aforementioned stars being the only reliable options in the midfield, Florentino Perez has to rush back into the market to provide some depth to his squad.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Health information on internet may reduce trust in doctors

first_imgLooking up health-related information on the internet can cause parents to not trust the diagnosis made by their child’s doctor, potentially leading to delayed treatment, a new study warns.Researchers from Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine in the US recruited 1,374 parent participants who were presented with a profile of a child who “has had a rash and worsening fever for 3 days.” The participants, who averaged 34 years of age and had at least one child under age 18, were then divided into groups. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the first group, participants received screen shots of internet information describing some symptoms of scarlet fever, an infectious disease linked to strep throat that causes rash and fever.Unless treated with antibiotics, scarlet fever can develop into rheumatic fever and, in some cases, lead to heart damage.The second group of participants received screen shots listing select symptoms of Kawasaki disease, a condition in which blood vessels throughout the body become inflamed. It also is accompanied by fever and rash. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivePrompt treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs is needed to help prevent life-threatening complications such as aneurisms.A third set of parents, the control group, received no internet screen shots. All participants then read that the doctor had diagnosed the child with scarlet fever.Compared to the control group, in which 81.0 per cent of parents reported trusting the physician, 90.5 per cent of parents who had received scarlet fever symptom screen shots reported trusting the physician. Furthermore, fewer parents in the scarlet fever cohort answered that they were likely to seek a second opinion (21.4 per cent), compared to the control group (42.0 per cent).Conversely, only 61.3 per cent of participants who had viewed the screen shots listing rash and fever as symptoms of Kawasaki disease reported trusting the doctors’ diagnosis, and 64.2 per cent reported that they were likely to seek a second opinion.Although there are many advantages of having easily accessible medical information available on the internet, the findings show that “internet-driven interpretation of symptoms” can compromise trust between a doctor and patient, researchers said.”The internet is a powerful information tool, but it is limited by its inability to reason and think,” said Ruth Milanaik, an associate professor at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.”Simply entering a collection of symptoms in a search engine may not reflect the actual medical situation at hand,” Milanaik said. “These computer-generated diagnoses may mislead patients or parents and cause them to question their doctors’ medical abilities and seek a second opinion, thereby delaying treatment,” she added.last_img read more

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