19 Jan
2020

Marbury opts for final season with Beijing Fly Dragons

first_imgMOST READ In 2010, Marbury jumped to the Chinese Basketball Association, playing for Shanxi and Foshan before settling in with the Ducks and sparking them to CBA crowns in 2012, 2014 and 2015 before parting ways with the club last April.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. McGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return LATEST STORIES ‘I’m out!’: PewDiePie releases last video before taking break from YouTube IT happens: Facebook sorry for Xi Jinping’s name mistranslationcenter_img View comments LeBron James scores 31 points, Lakers beat Rockets Former NBA superstar Stephon Marbury celebrates after his team, the Beijing Ducks, won their first-ever Chinese championship in Beijing on March 30, 2012. Led by former NBA badboy Marbury, who scored 41 points as the host team knocked off title holders Guangdong Tigers 124-121. AFP PHOTO / AFP PHOTO / STRFormer NBA All-Star Stephon Marbury said Wednesday he is headed back to Beijing for one final pro season, but will not be playing for the same Chinese Basketball Association squad.Marbury announced in an Instagram posting that he will play next season for the Beijing Fly Dragons after playing from 2011 through earlier this year with the Beijing Ducks.ADVERTISEMENT “I’m staying in Beijing for my last and final season. The other Beijing team,” Marbury wrote on Instagram beside a photo of himself and the Fly Dragons logo.“I have to put on for the city no matter the team. It’s a different mission and vision over here in the JING. The fans said stay so I’m staying. They said, ‘we will love you no matter where you go’ It’s hard to leave that type of love.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’The 40-year-old point guard began his NBA career with the Minnesota Timberwolves in 1996, taken fourth overall by Milwaukee but swapped to the T-Wolves for the rights to the player taken after him, Ray Allen.“Starbury” was an NBA All-Star for the New Jersey Nets in 2001 and Phoenix Suns in 2003 before joining his hometown New York Knicks from 2004-2009. Kawhi Leonard, Clippers rally to beat Pelicans Indian national gunned down in Camarines Sur 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano ONE Championship gets cash for major growthlast_img read more

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20 Dec
2019

Can President Donald Trump refuse latest offer from Jose Canseco?

first_imgAs evidenced by his latest outlandish offer to President Donald Trump, it’s clear that former Oakland A’s star Jose Canseco still likes swinging for the fences.With his tweet to the president Wednesday, Canseco is bidding not only to help run the White House, the notorious steroid user is also offering to pump up Mr. Trump.Hey little buddy @realDonaldTrump u need a bash brother for Chief if Staff. Got a secret reorg plan already. Also worried about you looking more like a Twinkie everyday. I …last_img

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18 Dec
2019

National crop commodity organizations looking to re-focus efforts moving forward

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest At the national level, corn, soybean and wheat commodity organizations are looking to assess their priorities for the future and focus on their strengths. There was an update outlining the plans for the future from each national organization at the December Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium held in Columbus.The National Corn Growers Association’s strategic plan will seek to enhance consumer trust, and related objectives. The plan will include strategies for key NCGA programs in that effort, including its participation in the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, CommonGround and the Corn Farmers Coalition.“We are looking into where we want to be at in five years with the development of a strategic plan,” said Anthony Bush, who serves on the NCGA Board and farms in Morrow County. “We felt like we were an inch deep and a mile wide and we felt like we really needed to focus on what we were good at. We are working on that and it will be coming out the end of January.”Ohio’s Jed Bower, of Fayette County, is serving on the NCGA Public Policy Action Team overseeing the development of the strategic plan.The American Soybean Association is also taking a strategic look at goals for the future.“ASA has gone through a large change in the past year. We are trying to find out where our pinpoint should be and it needs to be with our relationships with our senators and representatives on the important issues for us. We need to build domestic demand and expand our international market access,” said Bret Davis, who serves on the ASA board and farms in Delaware County. “The new ASA strategic plan focuses on demand goals, policy, trade and regulatory issues, and providing additional financial resources for policy work through new opportunities and providing states with flexibility to let them do what they do best.”These goals encompass a broad range of issues that will demand attention in the coming years.“High oleic soybeans are making a big difference in what our food systems are going to be needing. And aquaculture is a good place to use soybean meal in the food rations and that has been a real plus in the meal markets. It is a growing market that we can supply,” Davis said. “We are looking at freedom to operate too. If we can’t do the job that we are allowed to do by our consumers and regulators, it hurts in our pockets.”A strategy for the future certainly must include the recent changes in the Panama Canal, a key transportation boon for soybeans in particular.“We just went to Panama and got to see the Canal as it was being finished — what a difference that will make to allow us to move our beans to where they need to go,” Davis said.Other key issues include biotech labeling, a possible two-year extension on the biodiesel tax credit, and important trade relationships, including Cuba.“One of the great things I have seen in the last few years is that the soy industry is working so well together and our farmer-to-farmer relations have been fantastic and that is what it takes — working together for the soybean industry,” Davis said.David Schemm, a Kansas farmer with the National Association of Wheat Growers, talked about the importance of a strategic plan for the nation’s wheat growers.“The National Wheat Action Plan is in the beginning stages right now to get profitability back into wheat. It is not one single area but several areas that are needed to get profitability back into wheat right now. Mills are helping transition acres into organic wheat production to satisfy a market that they need more supply for. We are not saying organic is for everyone but it may work to increase profitability for some farms,” Schemm said. “We represent a huge part of the country geographically. Our major policy areas we have been working on for the past year are farm bill implementation, transportation and tax policy. We need to have one strong voice in agriculture on one united front on these issues. Grassroots engagement is the key.”The idea behind the Wheat Action Plan is to raise productivity so that wheat no longer loses acreage to corn and soybeans by being less economically appealing. NAWG calculates that for every $10 spent on public and private industry corn research in 2014, only 70 cents went into wheat research.Additional goals in the plan included genetic improvements for wheat yields, developing strong resistance to fusarium head blight (or scab), improved rust resistance for high moisture years, and drought tolerance. Opening trade barriers and expanding wheat exports are also key priorities.last_img read more

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17 Dec
2019

Pursue expanded use of American-grown, high-octane biofuels

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In an effort to expand the market for domestic agriculture products, reduce harmful emissions, and provide consumers with lower cost fuel choices, National Farmers Union, Farmers Union Enterprises and the Urban Air Initiative announced they have formed a strategic alliance to expand the use of American-grown biofuels.The three groups intend to pursue a broad spectrum of advocacy and advertising activities in furtherance of social, regulatory and legislative solutions to current barriers that limit the amount of biofuels used in the nation’s transportation sector.Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union, hailed the alliance as a “timely and powerful marriage of urban and rural priorities.”“Protecting the public health and welfare — and at the same time improving the rural economy and benefiting family farmers, is a win-win for America,” he said.Farmers Union Enterprises President Doug Sombke said there is an unprecedented opportunity at hand with the recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Transportation (DOT/NHTSA) proposed rule requesting input on whether and how U.S. regulatory policy should require higher quality, cleaner burning fuels such as E30. Automakers have said they need these fuels to power next-generation higher compression engines, resulting in improved fuel efficiency, a reduction in carbon and other harmful emissions, and significant cost savings for consumers at the pump.Urban Air Initiative Director Trevor Hinz noted that the vast body of best available science proves renewable ethanol’s superior octane properties substantially reduce the most harmful mobile source air toxics (MSATs), the predominant source of which are benzene-based aromatics that refiners synthesize from crude oil. Hinz cited the mandatory provision in the Clean Air Act that requires EPA/OTAQ to reduce MSATs to the “greatest extent achievable…as technologies present themselves.”FUE’s Sombke added that “at the end of the day, this is about putting America first and making sure that unaccountable regulators are not allowed to create an artificial monopoly for oil interests that harm consumers, the environment, and exacerbate our trade deficit.”last_img read more

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15 Dec
2019

What’s It Like To Work For Tim Cook? A Former Apple Sales Exec Dishes

first_imgRelated Posts dan lyons Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Apple CEO Tim Cook booted out two top executives last week, and some observers were surpised to see that Cook, who seems like a soft-spoken, amiable Southerner, can also play rough. “Cook has shown a ruthless side,” Charles Arthur of the Guardian wrote. One person who wasn’t surprised by Cook’s toughness was David Sobotta, a former Apple sales executive who just published The Pomme Company, a memoir of his 20 years (1984-2004) at Apple. Sobotta didn’t report directly to Cook, but as director of Apple’s federal sales group he had a lot of contact with Apple’s current CEO, who joined Apple in 1998 to run operations and, later, was executive vice president of worldwide sales.Since 2005 Sobotta has written an Apple-centric blog called Applepeels. Last fall he wrote to Cook informing him that he also intended to write a book about Apple. Sobotta quickly received a letter from Apple’s legal department, one that left him “extremely upset” and ready to abandon the project, he says.If you’re a hard-core Apple fan it’s a good read, if only to get a little taste of what life is like inside Apple. (In a word: Tough.)Sobotta insists that he has no ax to grind even though he remembers Cook humiliating Sobotta’s team at a sales conference by putting up a slide with a picture of a toilet plunger as commentary on the group’s performance. I emailed Sobotta and asked what he thought about Cook getting rid of Scott Forstall, who ran iOS development, and John Brownell, who Cook had hired to run retail less than a year ago. Via email, Sobotta shared the following:Not A People Person“Well, for starters, Cook is not a people person,” Sobotta writes. “He certainly will not stand behind someone if the going gets rough. He is not that kind of guy. I sense no personal loyalty in him, and I suspect employees already understand that.“Tim will react to the numbers or his fear of being wrong quickly. Fear of being wrong is a managerial trait that runs strong and deep in Apple because of the way Steve ran the company. Even the appearance of being wrong when in the end you might be right is dreaded at Apple.“You don’t make mistakes at Apple and get a second chance. That often hinders decision-making and creates a lot of passive-aggressiveness between teams that should be cooperating.” A Poor Judge Of Character“I haven’t followed the saga of the new retail guy so he might have been a terrible hire, but that would also fit the Cook pattern. The people I saw him hire were not good ones. I don’t think he relates well to people. Based on some of the people he has stuck with, I think he is poor judge of character. “Apple never had a disciplined way of making decisions. It was always whoever got Steve’s ear that won. Certain people always had the inside track. Likely the way to win now at Apple is to blow in Tim’s ear.”Tim On Tech“Technology-wise, I think Tim Cook is a lightweight. I never felt passion for technology from Tim like I did from Steve and some of the great engineers.”A Manager, Not A Leader“I would expect that Tim is having a hard time herding the chickens. From what I saw of him, he was something of a loner. He is not a warm guy nor is he the type to go wandering the halls or Caffe Mac to find out what is happening. His preference is to tinker with spreadsheets and numbers. He is not a natural leader. He’s a manager.“From what I saw, Tim is the kind of guy who would just fire some folks rather than try to sort out what is working and what isn’t working. I never felt like he wanted to get down into the details unless they were numbers. I also think he can easily be swayed by someone who protects him from the messy parts of running a company.”The Painful Part“I use Mountain Lion and Windows 7 both every day.  Windows works better. It pains me to say that. I would rate Apple’s screwing around with the ‘Save As’ command [Apple removed ‘Save As’ from OS X Lion but restored it, sort of, in Mountain Lion] as one of the dumbest user-interface decisions in the history of computing. I’m not sure pulling DVD drives out of iMacs is much better.  Certainly the maps decision [in iOS 6] will haunt Apple for a long time.“It is going to get worse at Apple. It is not a sustainable business culture.”Apres Steve, Le Deluge?“There are three factors that I see, the first being the business culture within the company. While the company needs strong leadership after Steve Jobs, anyone at Apple will tell you that taking risks and showing leadership (rocking the boat, trying something new) are not encouraged. With an environment like that, strong leaders end up butting their heads against the wall, and either leave on their on accord or get asked to leave. The company has a strong ‘manage up’ culture so it is not unusual for Apple managers to not really have a clue what is happening in their customer base.“Second, Apple doesn’t develop its own talent. The company has a strong propensity to hire folks from outside the company. The new folks come in, spend a year figuring which end is up, and end being very frustrated. [The experience is] demoralizing to the people who now report to them and who already knew what their bosses just spent a year learning. It is a horrendous way to run a company.”What’s The Next Great Thing?“The third is that Apple is a `next great thing’ company, and that in and of itself is unsustainable. They haven’t found the next great thing after the iPad and iPhone, and their shares in both those areas are slipping. Of course they are ignoring traditional computers to a large extent.“I could add a fourth [factor] related to the third point, but it’s debatable. Always in the past when Apple screwed up or got too cocky, they could fall back on a core group of `prosumers’ who were dedicated to Apple’s products. I think Apple has lost or is in the process of losing those folks, but I have no way to measure that other than I know a fair number of folks like myself that are no longer Apple products evangelists.“I got a note from [a former Apple colleague] last night that it was time to replace his wife’s MacBook and he offered to get her whatever she wanted. She chose Lenovo.”David Sobotta’s book, The Pomme Company, is available in Kindle format from Amazon. Don’t hold your breath waiting for an Apple iBooks version.Top image courtesy of Reuters. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Tags:#Apple#David Sobotta#iPad#iPhone#Mac#Tim Cook Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img
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12 Dec
2019

Comparing Documentary Styles: Cinéma Vérité to Modern Docs

first_imgLet’s take a look at the history of documentary filmmaking and explore the most popular approaches to the craft.[Above image from Shutterstock]The popularity of the modern documentary has steadily risen in recent years.  Since the Maysles brothers came onto the scene in the 1960s, it seems each generation since has embraced the concept of the documentary in their personal manner with increasing public interest. But what constitutes a true documentary? Who started the original movement? How did the modern documentary come to be? Let’s explore the answers below.Defining True DocumentariesAlthough some films are based off of true stories, the raw essence of real people, real events, and real places are what separate documentaries from the rest of the pack. Though the definition of a “true” documentary has changed over the years, they all incorporate some form of truth and fact. There are two main categories that the majority of documentary films fit into: Cinéma vérité and the modern documentary.The First DocumentaryThe roots of documentary filmmaking can be found in the frozen Canadian wilds, where Robert J. Flaherty filmed Nanook of the North, a 1922 silent film considered to be the first feature-length documentary. Nanook of the North was was one of the first 25 films to be selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, but it is not without criticism – Flaherty is known to have staged several of the film’s sequences. Nonetheless, it is obviously worth a look.Cinéma VéritéThe cinéma vérité genre originated in the 1960s in the French New Wave movement, due partially to technical advances of camera and audio equipment becoming increasingly portable. Contrasting with a studio-type style of production, the cinéma vérité genre captured a raw style using only on-location picture, audio, and lighting.Robert Drew, alongside Albert and David Maysles, further advanced this conceptual style with direct cinema, which emphasized direct relations between the film crew and the subjects. The absence of a narrator explaining things for the audience allowed the editor the freedom to conceptually tell the story in an obscure way. Drew’s work on Primary, about the 1960 Wisconsin Primary election between John F. Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States, is heralded as a masterpiece of direct cinema, and many consider Drew to be the father of cinéma vérité.Here’s a brief clip of Drew discussing Primary.Here’s a look at the landmark Maysles brothers film, Salesman.Modern DocumentaryThe modern documentary is different from the raw cinéma vérité style that came before. In contrast, interviews are set; narration is present, the cinematography can be sophisticated and a great deal of post-production is present in the way of editing, graphic effects, music and sound design. With the shift away from cinéma vérité came more informative directorial control, much like the style of Michael Moore’s documentaries (check out Roger and Me for a good example).Great development in regards to styles of modern documentaries is often attributed to Ken Burns. His use of archival and pictorial elements became a landmark of documentary making, particularly with the “Ken Burns Effect.”Theatrical releases of modern documentaries have become extremely successful in the last decade with box office sales soaring. Some critics will argue that the modern documentary lacks the “truth element”. The potential financial gain skews the truth and targets specific audiences. Whatever the case, the modern documentary will continue to evolve.SummaryBox office sales show that documentaries have reached an unprecedented peak in modern culture. Though modern documentaries have overshadowed cinéma vérité type documentaries over the years, there are many films still produced and inspired in a cinéma vérité production. In keeping with the continuing development of documentary films, we can all learn something to apply from the past to the future.If you’re interested in the world of documentary film, here are a few more articles you might enjoy:Tips for Documentary Film ProductionsLessons in Making a Better DocumentaryDistribution Tips from Documentary Filmmaker Scott ThurmanWhat style of documentary do you prefer? What are some of your favorite documentaries? Let’s discuss them in the comments below.last_img read more

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12 Dec
2019

In-Camera or in Post: How to Get the Same Effects as Expensive Lenses

first_imgYou can add the first two of these in After Effects with another great template, this time from RocketStock. You need to map the lens flares to the flares in your shot, which can be fine for a couple of shots, but it could be a huge headache for an entire feature film.These experiments concluded that it’s smart to test the effect you’re thinking about before you dive headlong into in-camera or post effects, to see where the best medium is: control vs. time. Then, at least you’ll know what you’re getting into.Looking for more video production tips and tricks? Check out these articles.Master Premiere Pro’s Timeline with Source PatchingWhat to Consider When Upgrading to the Pocket Cinema 6KThe Lost Joys of Using DIY Filmmaking Equipment3 Tips for Stabilizing Smartphone Videography5 Documentary-Style Lenses for 5 Budgets In this article, we take a look at three common effects and whether the post-production version lives up to the in-camera effect.One of the oldest questions in digital cinematography is “in-camera or in post?” Do stylistic choices like lens type, filters, and lens shake work better if you use them with the camera on set, or can you produce the same effect in the comfort of your post-production home — without compromising the original negative?Both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. In-camera effects are generally cheaper, and you can control their details on the day of shooting — with the director present for sign-off. Post-production effects take longer, but you get finer control, and if they’re too over the top, you can dial them down — or dial them up if you need to. Like any post effect, they cost more. However, they can cost a lot more if you’re trying to apply the effect — like anamorphic lens style — to an entire film.Let’s start with the easiest: lens filters. DPs who think modern digital cameras and lenses produce an image that is too sharp and clinical, and lacks the chemical imperfections of film, use pieces of glass or plastic that screw onto the lens or slide into the matte box. Tiffen’s Black Pro-Mist softens images in a very filmic way — especially skin imperfections — and blooms the highlights. It comes in different strengths, as well as screw-on and drop-in formats. We found that the mid-tone detail slider in DaVinci Resolve did a very similar job to Black Pro-Mist — as well as turning down contrast. The best result was adding the lightest kind of Black Pro-Mist 1/8 on the lens, then using Resolve to increase the effect. That way you’re not locked into an extreme look.The next challenge was camera shake. A small amount of camera shake finds its way into most handheld shots, and it is pretty standard. A violent and dramatic camera shaking effect, like those used in fight scenes or earthquakes, is hard to control and not healthy for the camera (over a long period, it can shake parts loose from the rig). There is even a device called the “image shaker” that mounts on the 15mm rails in front of the camera, shaking the image without shaking the delicate insides of the camera.With some motion blur, we found it pretty easy to add camera shake in post by using free templates on the internet and mapping the footage to them. Be aware that you’ll need to shoot at a higher resolution than your delivery resolution, so you have room to move the frame around and not see black around the outside of your frame.The last and most difficult in-camera effect we tried in post was anamorphic lenses. Many DPs are obsessed with anamorphic, but few movie-goers know or care which lens shape a filmmaker uses. That said, they can probably work on a conscious level to associate the film with other movies — both classic and contemporary — shot anamorphic.The three main visual qualities of anamorphic are vignetting, edge distortion, and an oval horizontal lens flare.last_img read more

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3 Dec
2019

Urea shortage hits sowing of rabi crop in Rajasthan

first_imgThe shortage of urea fertilizer in Kota and Baran districts of Rajasthan’s Hadoti region has created difficulties for the farmers sowing wheat, mustard, gram and other crops during the ongoing rabi season. Farmers have made long queues outside the distribution centres, while clashes between the agitating farmers and police were reported from Baran’s Chhipabarod and Relawan villages earlier this week.The fertilizer is not available in sufficient quantity even at the State government-run cooperative stores. Against the requirement of 3 lakh metric tonnes of urea in the region, only 1.39 lakh metric tonnes have been supplies so far, as the Agriculture Department’s officials have distributed slips to farmers for getting the urea bags at several police stations to maintain order.The district authorities have held the farmers’ habit of stockpiling of fertilisers responsible for the crunch. Baran Collector S.P. Singh said on Thursday that about 44,000 metric tonnes of urea had been distributed so far against the total allocation of 57,000 metric tonnes.‘Centre discriminating’Newly elected Congress MLA from Kota’s Sangod, Bharat Singh, said the Centre has started discriminating against Rajasthan by reducing the urea allocation because of the Congress being elected in the State Assembly polls. “The BJP wants to create a crisis situation, for which the farmers will blame the Congress government here. This tactic will backfire on them in next year’s Lok Sabha elections,” he said.Ironically, Kota is a major production centre for urea, as two hi-tech nitrogenous fertilizer plants of Chambal Fertilizers and Chemicals Limited (CFCL) are situated in the district. A large number of farmers have staged a dharna outside the CFCL plants with the demand that an adequate share in their daily production of 6,000 metric tonnes of urea be reserved for the local supply.Hadoti Kisan Union general secretary Dashrath Kumar told The Hindu that the demand for urea had increased in the current rabi season because of a higher sowing of wheat. ‘Withdraw condition’He said the CFCL should withdraw its necessary condition imposed on dealers for purchasing co-products along with the fertilizer and the urea should be distributed only at the cooperative stores.“Only an urgent provision of additional allocation for the Hadoti region by the Centre can improve the situation here. Farmers need an average of 20 to 30 urea bags each for their land holdings, but they are being given only 5 to 6 bags,” he said.last_img read more

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28 Sep
2019

Ohio State womens basketball blown out ousted from Sweet 16 by Tennessee

OSU senior guard Ameryst Alston (14) dribbles the ball during a game against Wagner on Nov. 22 at St. John Arena. Credit: Elizabeth Tzagournis | Lantern PhotographerThe last time the Tennessee and Ohio State women’s basketball teams met before Friday was in the 2011 NCAA Sweet 16 round. Fast forward five years to Friday night, and the two had a rematch in that very same rebound.The No. 7 seed Lady Vols were not the favorite coming into the matchup with the Buckeyes in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, but they disregarded the predictions from analysts and dominated the third-seeded Buckeyes 78-62.Tennessee came out of the gates strong and played with efficiency, taking quality shots from all areas of the court. Redshirt sophomore guard Diamond DeShields left the game for a stint with an injury, but would later return to contribute an all-around performance to the Lady Vols’ success.Tennessee took control of the contest in the first half by breaking the press with ease and using its height in the paint to its advantage.Tennessee’s post play was led by redshirt sophomore center Mercedes Russell who went a perfect 6-of-6 from the field, taking over the OSU forwards. The Springfield, Oregon, native showed poise on the block with her effortless post moves and displayed her clean shooting form, putting the ball through the nylon throughout the evening.Along with Russell’s success, senior forward Bashaara Graves also didn’t miss a shot in the first half, shooting 5-of-5.OSU, on the other hand, was far from perfect, struggling to get an offensive flow in the first 20 minutes of play. Only shooting 25 percent as a team in the first quarter, the Buckeyes had to find a solution to their offense if they wanted to keep it close going into the locker room.Missing their lead defender, senior guard Cait Craft, to a season-ending hand injury, the Buckeyes didn’t have a player to turn to shut down the Volunteers scorers.Senior guard Ameryst Alston, who has been struggling to perform because of a wrist injury suffered in the Big Ten tournament, did not want her senior year to end earlier than it had to be, ignoring the wrist pain and completing some of the acrobatic shots that she regularly converted before the injury.Sophomore guard Kelsey Mitchell took matters into her own hands for the rest of the first half, knocking down a slew of 3-pointers and finishing the half with 11 points.Even though OSU trailed after the first half of play, the Buckeyes did not show the urgency that they needed to catch up to the Lady Vols. OSU ignored the offensive strategy that it typically followed throughout the year and lacked energy on defense, putting the Scarlet and Gray in even more of a hole as the second half of play got underway.Tennessee’s offensive movement continued to be pristine and showed shades of coach Pat Summitt’s rosters back in the day. The Buckeyes simply had no answer for Tennessee and were unable to enforce their high-velocity pace that has been their go-to all season long.Russell would go on to score a game high 25 points and grab 14 rebounds, while Graves finished with 14 points and nine boards.Despite her injury, DeShields ended her night with 10 points and dished out seven assists, while grabbing five rebounds as well.On the Scarlet and Gray side, Alston led the Buckeyes with 21 points, ending her collegiate career on a strong note. Mitchell would follow her with 20 points, though she shot just 5-of-15 from the field.With the loss, the Buckeyes will board the plane back home to Columbus to begin their offseason, while the Lady Vols are set to continue to the Elite Eight to take on Syracuse and compete for a chance to make it to the Final Four. read more

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