25 Dec
2019

Lancaster line is big-time

first_img Lancaster’s success this season seems directly tied to the performance of its defensive line. In the Eagles’ six victories, they have yielded an average of just 8.6 points a game. In their two losses, foes put 54 points on the scoreboard. Lancaster is home against Antelope Valley tonight at 7 in a game that likely will be decided on the ground. Antelope Valley’s offense features senior running backs Andre Crenshaw and Darius Roberts. The winner will have the inside track to the Golden League title. “If a guy is bigger than you, you just have to stay low and not let him get his hands on you,” Dilger said. “Antelope Valley has got a real big line, so this will be a good challenge.” Dilger, the second cousin of former Colts tight end Ken Dilger, said Lancaster’s defensive lines succeeds because of its strength and speed. Drakes and Dilger are the strongest players on the team, likely the entire Golden League. Both squat 500 pounds and bench 320 pounds. They train together in the summer, five days a week for three hours at a local fitness club. “I’m the quiet one,” Drakes said. “Paul, when he goes to the gym, he turns into this weightlifter guy who yells when he’s lifting really heavy. … We didn’t have summer jobs this year, so we pretty much worked out every day.” Ross can’t lift the same weight as Dilger and Drakes, but he’s working on that. Would he like to gain weight? “No, not really,” Ross said. “I want to get stronger, but I only want to put on muscle. I’m fine with how I am.” Ramona Shelburne, (818) 713-3617 ramona.shelburne@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Nathan Drakes arrived at Lancaster High four years ago as a promising freshman. He was 14 and stood 6-foot, 250 pounds. His strong frame suggested he could add more weight. He seemed a perfect defensive line prospect, provided he kept growing. Instead, he’s done the opposite. As a senior, Drakes weighs 220 pounds. And he’s a better player because of it. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “I’ve been smaller than most of the guys I play against my whole high school career – it’s nothing new,” said Drakes, a first-team All-Golden League and All-Southern Section Div. III pick last year. “I was bigger as a freshman than I am now, but I was kind of chunky. I’m much stronger now.” Drakes isn’t the only undersized player on Lancaster’s defensive line. He’s one of the bigger ones. Nose guard Paul Dilger is 5-9, 265 pounds. Tackle Chris Ross is 6-2, 250 pounds. When they trot onto the field, they easily could be mistaken for linebackers. “We’re way smaller than other teams,” said Ross, a junior. “I think just about every team we’ve played has a bigger line than we do. But it doesn’t matter as long as we get the job done.” last_img read more

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18 Dec
2019

Bin cleaners bring Hollywood to Khayelitsha

first_img23 March 2016Buhle Sithela cleans bins in Khayelitsha and uses the money to screen films https://t.co/PyEKZgu6dv pic.twitter.com/xAyyapk00v— neo (@_maditla) March 17, 2016As an events marketing student at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), 21-year-old Buhle Sithela started his bin cleaning business as part of a practical assignment. It soon blossomed into a full-time community service.“I wanted to do something that would benefit the community, so I set up this event where people in my (area) could bring their bins and me and my friends would wash them for a small fee,” Sithela told Amaphiko social enterprise website.The Khayelitsha Bin Clean Project is based in Harare, Khayelitsha. Every Friday, Sithela and his friends clean more than 30 bins, charging R50 per bin. “Initially,” says Sithela, “we didn’t have that many bins. We started with five bins, but things picked up so quickly.”Clients – such as resident Linda Madlebe – are happy with the service, and speak glowingly about Sithela and his friends’ efforts to improve the neighbourhood. “These guys are setting a good example in our community,” Madlebe told Amaphiko, “especially given that it is gang-ridden. I hope their project grows.”Sithela focuses on the project full-time as he had to drop out of college last year because of a lack of funds. But it hasn’t been without its difficulties. Besides money being tight, some of the people who help him clean the bins have personal problems that make running the project difficult. “Some of them are suffering from drug addiction and there are times I’ve had to single-handedly clean over 30 dustbins. It’s tough.”Yet there have been personal triumphs and great learning experiences from starting the business, he says. One of the ways he gives back using the money raised from the business, is to offer community film screenings for youngsters and older residents alike. “Film has always been one of my biggest passions, but. there are little to no cinemas in the townships. So I decided to start my own screenings.”Since July, Sithela has hosted regular film screenings at a local church. “I had to borrow speakers and a projector from a friend, (and while) the (first) turnout wasn’t great either. I was just happy I did it,” he explains. Some of the films shown include the recent James Bond film and popular favourites such as the Rush Hour movies and Friday, as well as the latest local films.While financing the events present a challenge, leaving not much money from the business over for himself, he is still glad he’s making a difference for his community. And all his hard work has not gone unnoticed.Sithela is doing an internship with another innovative entertainment business, the mobile, solar-powered cinema Sunshine Cinema, which takes movies to rural and disadvantaged areas.It has been useful to research ways of expanding his own plans for his business, he says. “I just hope it grows big enough to sustain my passion for cinema. I have this dream of hosting a huge open air screening at Lookout Hill in Khayelitsha. Slowly but surely, I’m getting there.”Source: Amaphiko websitelast_img read more

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3 Dec
2019

Congress names seven more candidates

first_imgThe All India Congress Committee late on Tuesday night released its sixth list naming candidates for seven seats from Maharashtra, including one in Mumbai. Former MP and senior Congress leader Eknath Gaikwad will be the party’s candidate from Mumbai South Central. Sitting MLAs K.C. Padvi and Kunal Patil have been fielded from Nandurbar (ST) and Dhule respectively. Former State unit president Manikrao Thakare is the candidate from Yavatmal-Washim, while Charulata Tokas and Bhausaheb Kamble will contest from Wardha and Shirdi (SC). Navinchandra Bandivadekar will contest the Ratnagiri-Sindhudurg seat in Konkan. Mr. Gaikwad faces sitting Shiv Sena MP Rahul Shewale. Mr. Padvi is one of the senior-most tribal MLAs in Nandurbar, a traditional stronghold of Congress. Mr. Padvi had recently resigned from Assembly as a mark of protest over the State government’s move to extend tribal benefits to the Dhangar community. In Ratnagiri-Sindhudurg, rumours were afloat that party would exchange the seat with NCP which could extend support to Nilesh Rane of Maharashtra Swabhiman Party.last_img read more

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16 Nov
2019

Watch Guide: OSU and Arizona

first_img[table id=32 /]If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img

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14 Oct
2019

Manitobas cigarette battle with Dakotas could end with blockades Nelson

first_imgBy Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsA battle between Manitoba and Dakota communities over cigarette taxes could spread across the province and ignite rail blockades and other actions, says one of the candidates running for national chief of the Assembly of First Nations.A Manitoba court on Wednesday handed down a temporary injunction against the Dakota to shut down their smoke shop which has been selling tax-free cigarettes manufactured by Mohawk company Rainbow Tobacco, of Kahnawake Territory in Quebec.The Dakota, however, said they would ignore Manitoba’s injunction and keep the Chundee Smoke Shop open because the Dakota never signed any treaties giving Manitoba jurisdiction over their territory.“There is no turning back,” said Canupawakpa Dakota Chief Frank Brown. “Where is the legal documentation on provincial jurisdiction over the Dakotas?”Brown said he is willing to go to jail if the province and the RCMP attempt to shut down the smoke shop, near Pipestone, Man.“If the province wants to use the RCMP illegally, to illegally arrest us and illegally put us in jail, that is their doing and the world is going to know that,” said Brown. “They are like organized crime.”Former Roseau River chief Terry Nelson, who is running for national chief of the AFN, said he is planning on selling Mohawk cigarettes informally throughout Winnipeg in support of the Dakota.“Now we are going to look at the 700,000 people in Winnipeg as our market,” said Nelson.Nelson wouldn’t say how the cigarettes would be sold throughout the city which would go for about $20 a carton.“We are not in it for the money, we are in it for the point,” said Nelson.Nelson said the Ojibway under Treaty 1, which covers Winnipeg, have a right to sell tobacco which he said was stolen from Indigenous people by the “white man.”A carton of cigarettes in Winnipeg goes for about $108 a carton, he said.Nelson also said there will be swift reaction if the RCMP is sent in to enforce the injunction against the Dakotas.“If these guys start using the RCMP and guns to shut them down, there is going to be retaliation and the blocking of railway lines,” said Nelson. “If something happens to them, if someone gets killed, hauled away in handcuffs and dragged or women are getting beaten then the RCMP have a hell of a problem. That is when you will see cars on the railway tracks, because that’s the end of treaty.”Nelson said any bloodshed initiated by authorities would ignite a national backlash.The Chundee Smoke Shop has been raided five times and the province has laid over 60 charges alleging the cigarettes are not licensed for sale in Manitoba. Despite the repeated crackdowns, the Dakota remain defiant.They showed their defiance on Wednesday, as Dakotas on horseback led about 100 protestors to the court house in Winnipeg. Brown and Dakota Wahpeton Plains Chief Orville Smoke refused to participate in the proceedings. The chiefs arrived without lawyers.“The lawyers are in a conflict of interest and the courts are in a conflict of interest, everything is one-sided,” said Brown. “It’s their provincial court, their lawyers and their judges.”Brown said revenue from the smoke shop has allowed them to buy a fire truck and bison meat for their communities, which suffer from 90 per cent unemployment. The money has also been used to pay for post-secondary education for some of the communities’ youth, said Brown.The Dakota have also been seeking international support for their cause.Brown and Smoke both met with officials from the Iranian embassy in Ottawa this past March along with Nelson. They both sent representatives to accompany Nelson when the former Roseau River chief announced his candidacy for AFN national chief at a mosque in April.Brown said the Dakota follow the “law of the land,” and called the provincial government a “corporation” that follows “admiralty law,” in reference to thinking associated with the sovereign citizen movement.“Admiralty law is the law of the sea, it is the people that are on ships and they have a different law on water and the ones on water follow that law. That admiralty was brought into our land and it is being used,” said Brown. “That law belongs to the sea, to the water. The courtroom represents the ship and we are not stepping into that.”The ideas associated with viewing provinces and Canada as corporations that only have authority over individuals who allow themselves to be controlled have gained traction in many First Nations communities over the years, including in the Mohawk community of Akwesasne.The sovereign citizen movement has also flourished in the U.S.jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

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