21 Dec
2019

Corning boys fall to Hamilton in penalty kicks

first_imgCorning >> The Corning boys had their hands full at home Tuesday against Hamilton and ultimately suffered a loss after the game ended knotted at 1 then went into overtime, followed by penalty kicks, which ended 5-4 in favor of the Braves.“They played their hearts out,” said Cardinals coach Victor Torres. “Hamilton’s a good rival. They have a good program over there. We never quit, though. I’m a proud coach.” Hamilton kept control of the ball early and often, allowing little time for Corning …last_img

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20 Dec
2019

Photos | Exploring the California super bloom on Table Mountain

first_imgCHICO — A visit to Table Mountain during the months of spring rain is the best time to find fresh wildflowers before summer heat sets in. With the promise of a super bloom this year thanks to several extremely heavy storms, I was very hopeful about this spring’s potential for flowers up on the meadows and along the flowing creek, and took an afternoon drive to the mountain before the rain clouds returned.Driving from Chico to Durham-Pentz Road and Cherokee Road up to North Table Mountain …last_img

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17 Dec
2019

Dicamba Deadline Questions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Pamela SmithDTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology EditorDECATUR, Ill. (DTN) — The Illinois Fertilizer and Chemical Association (IFCA) has issued a statement on dicamba stewardship supporting June 30 as a cutoff date for application in that state.Concerns with weather-related planting delays of soybeans have some in the agriculture industry beginning to question the cutoff date, said Jean Payne, IFCA president. “IFCA felt it important to again communicate the primary reasons for the cutoff, which have not changed,” she added.In February, the Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) hosted meetings to discuss the management and regulation of dicamba use on soybeans. As a result of those discussions, the department implemented a 24(c) Special Local Needs Label with several protective measures. The most notable of those was an application cutoff of June 30, 2019.Participating in these meetings were Acting IDA Director John Sullivan, Deputy Director Warren Goetsch, the management team of the IDA Bureau of Environmental Programs, representatives from IFCA, Illinois Farm Bureau, Soybean Association, Corn Growers, UI Weed Science Extension and the registrants of dicamba products labeled for use on soybeans: Bayer, BASF, Corteva and Syngenta.In 2018, IDOA received 546 total pesticide complaints, including 330 dicamba-related complaints. In 2017, there were 430 total complaints, 246 of which were related to the use of dicamba on soybeans. Prior to the 2017 introduction of the new formulations of dicamba for use on tolerant soybean varieties, total pesticide misuse complaints average 110 per year from 1989 to 2016.“The weather delays this spring have been a huge challenge,” Payne said. “However, our industry’s commitment to stewardship is often tested when conditions make it difficult to conduct normal operations. But it is our resolve to do the right thing, even when it is difficult, that makes the IFCA organization so successful in terms of managing pesticide and nutrient policy so that we have the trust of other organizations, and the legislature, to effectively police ourselves.”IFCA issued the following reasoning of why it would not support an extension of the cutoff date:1. The reason for the cutoff date is to protect sensitive crops (orchards, specialty crops) and sensitive areas (trees, residential areas and other natural areas). Application of these products in the summer months, as temperatures increase, can increase the volatility of even low-volatile formulations of dicamba. The fact that many specialty crops, trees and other sensitive plants have reached mature vegetation and/or reproductive stages by July poses a more pronounced risk to those plants and areas from any off-target movement of dicamba. The industry group that met in February acknowledged that the June 30 cutoff would preclude the use of dicamba on double-crop soybeans, but believed this decision to be appropriate given that sensitive areas, trees and specialty crops such as orchards and vineyards are also prevalent in the Southern Illinois landscape.2. The possibility of late soybean planting was discussed at the IDA-Industry meetings. However, establishing a cutoff date would still, even in a year when soybean is planted late, enable the use of dicamba in soybean in early growth stages in the majority of instances where a dicamba application is desired. Soybeans planted prior to May 15 must already abide by 45 days after planting restriction for dicamba application, which in those instances will occur prior to June 30.3. The long-term use of dicamba in soybeans and corn is paramount. In supporting the cutoff date, the Illinois ag industry looked at what can be gained, versus what can be lost, in terms of herbicide needs for both soybeans and corn. If complaints to IDA from both farmers and the non-farming public do not decrease in 2019, the future use of dicamba in all crops is in serious jeopardy. There are methods available to successfully manage weeds, using dicamba as a tool, but not as the singular product choice. The impact of dicamba on trees and sensitive areas is a major concern of the non-farming public; if we cannot reduce complaints and off-target symptoms, there is a high probability that the Illinois legislature may take up the issue of dicamba use, and other pesticide uses, resulting in potential restrictions that would be far more onerous than a reasonable cutoff date for dicamba use.The University of Illinois also issued a statement on May 6 to provide guidance for weed management options given the June 30 cutoff date and other label considerations.University of Illinois weed scientist Aaron Hager reminded Illinois growers that there are actually four cutoff dates to keep in mind in the state with regard to dicamba:— R1 soybean growth stage (from original registration in fall 2016).— 45 days after soybean planting (from renewed labels in October 2018).— V4 soybean growth stage for those using Tavium, a recently labeled dicamba premix from Syngenta.— June 30, 2019, mandated by the Illinois 24(c) label.Farmers in other states have different requirements and should adhere to state labels. However, Hager’s bulletin also contains generic information on how to manage weeds in late-planted situations. To read the entire bulletin report go to: http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/…To read the entire IFCA statement in support of the June 30 cutoff go to: https://ifca.com/…Pamela Smith can be reached at Pamela.smith@dtn.comFollow her on Twitter @PamSmithDTN(ES/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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12 Dec
2019

How to Produce Compelling Corporate Video

first_imgThe professional market is flooded with great videographers. Use these tips to develop compelling corporate video and make your work stand out.Today’s market for freelance videography and corporate video production is flooded with producers. With so many professionals offering the same services, how can you realistically stand out from the rest?It seems everyone with an iPhone or iPad can generate a video. Because of this, video producers have to really step up their game when it comes to production. And the best way to do that is to break away from the standard corporate video mold and draw on influences from cinema and top-end commercials in order to make your work rise above the crowd.Step 1: Work Closely With Your ClientNo one knows their own business more than your client, so listen intently to them when they tell you what they want to convey. Savvy companies will have a solid marketing strategy for the video you are going to produce. Just make sure that while you’re listening to their desires, you’re formulating how to creatively frame their desires on film. Having a good creative collaboration with your client is key.Step 2: Make Sure the Visuals Have ValueVideo from IDG Knowledge HubWhenever you’re putting together a corporate video, you want to relay the client information to the audience in the quickest and clearest way possible. This means you need to make sure that you aren’t wasting any visual time. All the visuals you use need to have a purpose and a value to the information that you are trying to convey.Step 3: Embrace the CinematicVideo from Brian McGintyOne thing that most audiences and clients like is when you move away from the traditional regimented corporate videos of the past and bring a more dynamic visual style. A great way to do this is to look for inspiration in your favorite films, music videos, or commercials. Any of these will give you a wealth of cinematic samples. Don’t be afraid to treat a corporate video in a very cinematic way. By doing this, you can really draw the audience in for your client.Step 4: Get to the PointVideo from EveryAppleVideoOne thing clients may not understand is the attention span of end users in today’s video market. They want their information to be quick and to the point. This means you need to take all the information the client wants to convey and condense it into the shortest form possible. Usually this will call for the video to be between a minute and a half to two minutes long.Step 5: Leave the Audience Wanting MoreVideo from Kings Cross MediaBy the end of the video, two things should happen… your client should want to do more business with you, and the audience should want to know more about your client. You do this by following the steps above and conveying your client’s message clearly and directly. As the video above does really well, you’ll want to leave the video with a small hook that will keep the audience coming back for more.A Few More TipsVideo from Bailey Cooper Photography and VideoIf you want a few more basic tips on putting together solid corporate videos, then be sure to check out the video above. Or head on over to RocketStock and check out their article on five great steps to improve your corporate video. Just remember to work closely with your client and get the best possible video to aid their end goals.Are you working on a corporate video? Was this information helpful to you? Do you have other video production questions that you want answered? Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more

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3 Dec
2019

Urea shortage hits sowing of rabi crop in Rajasthan

first_imgThe shortage of urea fertilizer in Kota and Baran districts of Rajasthan’s Hadoti region has created difficulties for the farmers sowing wheat, mustard, gram and other crops during the ongoing rabi season. Farmers have made long queues outside the distribution centres, while clashes between the agitating farmers and police were reported from Baran’s Chhipabarod and Relawan villages earlier this week.The fertilizer is not available in sufficient quantity even at the State government-run cooperative stores. Against the requirement of 3 lakh metric tonnes of urea in the region, only 1.39 lakh metric tonnes have been supplies so far, as the Agriculture Department’s officials have distributed slips to farmers for getting the urea bags at several police stations to maintain order.The district authorities have held the farmers’ habit of stockpiling of fertilisers responsible for the crunch. Baran Collector S.P. Singh said on Thursday that about 44,000 metric tonnes of urea had been distributed so far against the total allocation of 57,000 metric tonnes.‘Centre discriminating’Newly elected Congress MLA from Kota’s Sangod, Bharat Singh, said the Centre has started discriminating against Rajasthan by reducing the urea allocation because of the Congress being elected in the State Assembly polls. “The BJP wants to create a crisis situation, for which the farmers will blame the Congress government here. This tactic will backfire on them in next year’s Lok Sabha elections,” he said.Ironically, Kota is a major production centre for urea, as two hi-tech nitrogenous fertilizer plants of Chambal Fertilizers and Chemicals Limited (CFCL) are situated in the district. A large number of farmers have staged a dharna outside the CFCL plants with the demand that an adequate share in their daily production of 6,000 metric tonnes of urea be reserved for the local supply.Hadoti Kisan Union general secretary Dashrath Kumar told The Hindu that the demand for urea had increased in the current rabi season because of a higher sowing of wheat. ‘Withdraw condition’He said the CFCL should withdraw its necessary condition imposed on dealers for purchasing co-products along with the fertilizer and the urea should be distributed only at the cooperative stores.“Only an urgent provision of additional allocation for the Hadoti region by the Centre can improve the situation here. Farmers need an average of 20 to 30 urea bags each for their land holdings, but they are being given only 5 to 6 bags,” he said.last_img read more

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