17 Aug
2019

Flight Centre battles pricefixing case

first_imgFlight Centre will go to court today to defend allegations of price-fixing in a case that will see the travel giant face massive fines and injunctions if they lose.Set to face the Brisbane Federal Court over the next three weeks, the travel company vigorously denies allegations by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) that they schemed with Singapore Airlines, Malaysian Airlines and Emirates to set ticket prices and keep commissions high.Flight Centre chief executive Graham Turner has  criticised the claims, calling them “stupid” and insists Flight Centre did not seek to have suppliers raise prices or withdraw fares, news.com.au reported.The International Air Transport Association (IATA) sought permission from the court last week to intervene in the case that is seen as the first significant test of new price-fixing laws that came into effect in 2010.Under the law, companies found to have engaged in the practice can be fined up to $10 million, three times the benefit of their illegal conduct or ten percent of their total revenues per offence.The uncertainty in the travel sector and the flow-on implications for those in other sectors is a concern if the ACCC prevails, according to analysts.This is not the first battle for Flight Centre against the ACCC after they were forced to scrap its ‘Lowest Airfares Guaranteed’ slogan and take out advertising to inform the public back in 2005. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: K.W.last_img read more

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24 Jul
2019

Susan Sontag was true author of exhusbands book biography claims

first_imgBooks This article is more than 2 months old Share on Facebook Sign up for Bookmarks: discover new books in our weekly email Sontag: Her Life says she wrote Freud: The Mind of the Moralist by Philip Rieff, whom she married at 17 Alison Flood Share Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 1:28 Share on Twitter maxmaier Shares4,3484348 25 | Pick A new biography of Susan Sontag is set to claim that the American writer was the true author of her first husband Philip Rieff’s seminal work Freud: The Mind of the Moralist.Out in September, Sontag: Her Life by Benjamin Moser lays out textual and anecdotal evidence that Sontag was not only the unofficial co-author of the 1959 analysis of Freud, which has long been known. Then in her 20s, the celebrated writer and filmmaker collaborated on the book with the sociologist Rieff, whom she married at the age of 17, just 10 days after attending one of his lectures.Earlier editions of the 1959 book credit her – as Susan Rieff – with “special thanks” in the preface, but by 1961 any acknowledgement of Sontag had been dropped. According to Susan Sontag: An Annotated Bibliography, their 1959 divorce settlement stipulated she agree to Rieff’s claim of sole authorship.While writing Sontag: Her Life, Moser was given permission by her estate to study the parts of her archive at UCLA that are off limits to the public for the next few decades, and also spoke to friends and acquaintances who had not previously opened up about their relationships with the writer.Moser acknowledges in the biography that Freud: The Mind of the Moralist is based, at least to some degree, on Rieff’s research and notes, but claims: “He almost certainly did not actually write the book upon which his career was based.” Sontag’s friend Minda Rae Amiran told him that, while the pair lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts, “Susan was spending every afternoon rewriting the whole thing from scratch”.Sontag’s diaries record how, in August 1957, she “continued to sort Freud materials, made notes, worked on some rough passages in Ch. 2”. Twitter Read more Moser quotes a letter Sontag wrote to her mother, in which she says that she is “in third gear now on the book – working about 10 hours a day on it at least”. And, in a letter to the author from her friend Jacob Taubes in 1958, he asks: “Did you, by the way, relinquish all rights on the Freud? It would be a crime.” When she says that she has, he replies: “I am without consolation … You cannot give your intellectual contribution to another person … It could be the ruin of Philip if he dared to come out shamelessly without your signature.”According to Moser, who is also the author of a biography of Clarice Lispector, 40 years later Rieff sent a package to Sontag containing a copy of the book, inscribed with the lines: “Susan, Love of my life, mother of my son, co-author of this book: forgive me. Please. Philip.” Rieff died in 2006.In a statement to the Guardian, Moser said: “It had long been rumoured that Susan Sontag was the true author of her husband’s great book, Freud: The Mind of the Moralist. She married Philip Rieff when she was just 17; in the pictures she looks even younger. And the book is so sophisticated that it hardly seemed possible that she could be the true author. But in the course of my research, I discovered that she had indeed written it, only agreeing to sign it over during an acrimonious divorce, in order to keep her ex-husband from taking her child. ‘It was a blood sacrifice,’ a friend told me.”When Freud: The Mind of the Moralist was first published, the Guardian hailed it as “an event to be acclaimed … a book of genuine brilliance on Freud’s cultural importance … a permanently valuable contribution to the human sciences”. Scientific American, meanwhile, noted: “Rieff’s tremendous scholarship and rich reflections fill his pages with memorable treasures.”After Sontag divorced Rieff, her career took off. Her first collection of essays, Against Interpretation, was published in 1966, followed three years later by Styles of Radical Will.An Annotated Bibliography notes that “topics defining of Sontag’s intellectual itinerary” are evident throughout the book, “as can be gleaned from chapter titles alone: The Hidden Self, The Tactics of Interpretation, The Authority of the Past”. Readers “will likely hear Sontag’s voice as part of the book’s conversation with itself and its sources, via references (for example) to William Empson and Kenneth Burke, to Proust and Shakespeare and Mann, to Nietzsche and Goethe, etc.”Sontag: Her Life is based on hundreds of interviews with people who knew her well, including the photographer Annie Leibovitz, said publisher Allen Lane, which releases the book on 17 September. Stephen Fry has called it a “monumental” biography that “reveals the surprisingly tender, insecure, simple and intellectually dedicated story of one the most remarkable literary figures to emerge in 20th-century America”. ID9769003 | Pick Report | Pick Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Reply Share on Facebook 23 24 Report Share via Email | Pick Reply 4 5 Share on Facebook 5 6 Yes. 10 11 10 11 Share BordyBord 0 1 11 12 Guardian Pick I’ve loved Susan Sontag since I first read Against Interpretation. She had a beautiful prose style and a brilliant mind. Everything she wrote was quotable: “I envy paranoids; they actually feel people are paying attention to them.” It was very gracious of her to let her husband take sole credit for Freud to which it appears she contributed. She must have loved him very much at this period in her life to let him take all the limelight. Perhaps wor… Urban2 Jembo Jembo Facebook Mrdaydream Twitter Mrdaydream Share on Facebook Support The Guardian Jump to comment 14 May 2019 Share 1 2 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Twitter salamandertome newest cossackathon Jembo Jembo Show 25 SlumVictim 2 3 100 14 May 2019 5:34 Report collapsed Share 4 5 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 1:05 Report This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. 14 May 2019 7:16 cossackathon maxmaier 3 4 Share Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter 1 Reply | Pick Share Twitter Share on Twitter Report 16 17 Share Yeah, like Wilma Shakespeare’s. 2 Facebook Share on Facebook 1 2 Shades of Meg Wolitzer’s The Wife! Facebook Share How many other instances of the appropriation of women’s work by talentless men have been buried? It is a tale as old as human society. Facebook news Facebook 50 You never had to deal with the injustice of the Family Court. Losing a kid or not having your name on the spine of a book, you make clear what you’d prefer. 14 May 2019 0:20 Twitter Share Facebook Facebook Twitter | Pick Report Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 2:33 13 May 2019 23:04 Twitter Well, there’s Colette. Will Sontag get booted from the feminist Valhalla for having written a book generally favorable to Sigmund Freud? Report Reply Facebook 14 May 2019 2:09 5 6 Facebook Reply This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Twitter unclearleo Twitter Jembo Jembo Twitter 1 2 Share on Facebook Susan Sontag was true author of ex-husband’s book, biography claims Reply Facebook Share Facebook Share on Facebook Urban2 Share on Twitter OK – why doesn’t this seem important to you ? = plagiarism sealed by a rather unpleasant divorce settlement. It does little for Philip Rieff’s reputation, if fully true. It was an impressive piece of work, whoever was the principal author. (If of course you feel the whole thing is trivial, why read the article?) Susan Montague? Share on Twitter Her husband wrote her most famous book. Share on Facebook Share 14 May 2019 14 May 2019 11:03 Last modified on Tue 14 May 2019 00.34 EDT Facebook 2 3 Share on Twitter Facebook Share on Facebook Report Reply 2 3 Reply Sontag’s voice is a necessary mentor for all of us as we face stern tests from identity politics of our intellectual future. That she was abused by not just a man but her husband carries many echoes of the contemporary discourse concerning the abuse of women. However, perhaps we should not view this only as a gender issue, maybe the issue is really just about bullying and abuse rather than the gender identity of the victim and oppressor? In our… Share on Twitter Reply | Pick 14 May 2019 4:55 mythology 14 May 2019 1:44 Reuse this content,View all comments > deadgod A month of montage do not make a Sonntag. | Pick 13 May 2019 22:59 Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook Guardian Pick Reason (optional) Twitter | Pick FolkSpirit Share Share Share on Twitter I wondered that too! Reading the article I see reasonably convincing evidence that she was a co-author of the book. What is “true author”? Urban2 Share on Facebook 14 May 2019 4:14 Twitter Reply Share on Twitter | Pick 14 May 2019 3:54 | Unpick Twitter catbirdfarm Twitter mythology Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Facebook mythology Order by oldest Report | Pick Are your sure the biographer was a “he”? uraniaargus 13 May 2019 23:21 13 May 2019 23:11 Reply It’s not uncommon for certain academics and other experts to hand over a load of research to someone who can write and say, ‘go make something of that’. You’d be surprised. They can still claim authorship in a sense because they did the footwork and tell the ghost what they’d like to be said in broad outline. Still, it’s not exactly best practice. In the case of the Executioner’s Song it was the other way round, and Mailer had the decency to say… Share on Facebook Facebook Twitter Twitter Reply Guardian Pick Share on Facebook DidierTrumpet Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 14 May 2019 3:11 Sigmund Freud Share ninjamia Reply Share on Twitter Report Report | Pick Show 6 more replies Report Biography books Facebook Reply 14 May 2019 1:19 Facebook Share on Twitter Loading comments… Trouble loading? Twitter Reply Share on WhatsApp | Pick LiddingtonBear Twitter Share on Twitter Dudesicle Catcher in the thigh or Thatcher in the lie Share on Facebook SmileyFace2 Share on Facebook 13 May 2019 23:23 Facebook Share on Facebook RobertJames Books Share on Facebook Facebook Note for subs: May want to include the year that Sontag died as well as Rieff? Reply Reply Not that I have read anything written by either of these authors but I would think that this book would stand out from all the others Rieff produced. As his young wife was putting in 10 hour days “rewriting” his research he obviously was more of a scholar then an author.Or did he go out on top and not publish again? A literary one hit wonder as were. Share on Facebook Facebook 9 10 Share | Pick Email (optional) Report 14 May 2019 1:37 They had a fight, probably over trivial things, or maybe they were both unbearable, big deal. He may even have behaved like an idiot. But, no matter how much I respect Susan Sontag’s input to culture and understanding, the case for changing attribution from Rieff to Sontag is probably overcooked.I have no problem to add her as an author, but this was Rieff’s work, his topic, his notes. She was a better writer than he was, probably, but I would not vilify Rieff posthumously. Susan Sontag didn’t do that, and in marrying him and adding to his work, she clearly saw something in his ideas. Facebook Share Reply Share 3 4 | Pick Share on Twitter 13 May 2019 23:03 15 16 Report 13 May 2019 23:22 Reply Report Reply She didn’t appropriate her work, but she was inspired by the use of electricity to make limbs of dead frogs move again – which Faraday did to great aplomb in London and it was a world wide sensation. Nomadrepat “…whom she married at the age of 17, just 10 days after attending one of his lectures” them were the days! Reply Twitter Report Twitter dyon Share Share on Twitter wattlesong Lets say yes! Reply Share on Facebook Share Share on Twitter animaux 14 May 2019 0:09 14 May 2019 3:11 38 39 14 May 2019 9:38 Facebook Share on Facebook 14 May 2019 1:16 Voltan Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Facebook animaux marchino61 Facebook 13 May 2019 23:00 Facebook The one who writes the tome. Reiff provided the research notes from which Sontag created ‘his masterpiece’. Ah, men and their fragile egos. Think of the farmer who provides the chicken and vegies, and the Chef who creates a very fine new dish. 14 May 2019 1:13 83 84 | Pick Share on Facebook | Pick Reply Share Are you suggesting Mary Shelley appropriated other peoples’ work? I was not aware. Nobody is saying that all men are evil, or that all women are saints – simply that there is a history of women’s work being appropriated by more prominent men, or their contribution being overlooked (Rosalind Franklin, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Esther Lederberg, etc). If this is also the case here, then that history is worth a mention. And pointing out inequalities of the past (and the present) is not turning women into victims – but asking them to a… SmugBug comments (111)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. She really wasn’t in the feminist Valhalla; she actually seemed quite male-identified in her work if you ask me… Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. 4 5 Share on Twitter RobertJames catbirdfarm heartman animaux Share on Facebook 14 May 2019 4:13 4 5 Share on Twitter Reply 3 4 Report Facebook Is this really such a big deal? expanded Report 14 May 2019 0:17 Comments 111 Jembo Jembo Biscuit74 dyon oldest Share 2 3 Share on Facebook I reckon she had the better half of the divorce settlement. Share 38 39 | Pick Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Facebook Reply Timeforpud And… Nádia Battella Gotlib should probably receive some credit for a certain English language biography of Lispector… SmileyFace2 Facebook Report Facebook Share on Twitter Facebook Share on LinkedIn Report Show 5 more replies SlumVictim 14 15 Report 2 3 Share on Twitter Reply 13 May 2019 22:40 Twittercenter_img recommendations | Pick 14 May 2019 6:14 Biscuit74 Share on Twitter Reply Share on Twitter Share Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other maxmaier RationalDisclosure Report That remark doesn’t seem to do justice to what appears to have been a great wrong. | Pick Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 8:16 Share dyon 5 6 Reply Facebook Mrdaydream Share on Facebook Firstact Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 2:56 Share on Twitter Reply uraniaargus Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 0:21 Share via Email tushe Share Share | Pick Report 23 24 Share on Facebook gbarron0077 Facebook Share SlumVictim Twitter 14 May 2019 3:33 Cad. Reply | Pick Share on Twitter Facebook With a divorce that bitter, I would’ve thought that such an attempt at blackmail by her ex would have seen a court agreeing to both custody of her son and co-authorship of the book in question. david baker 14 May 2019 9:59 Reply Nicto | Pick Reply Share on Twitter Report Report Sontag’s voice is a necessary mentor for all of us as we face stern tests from identity politics of our intellectual future. That she was abused by not just a man but her husband carries many echoes of the contemporary discourse concerning the abuse of women. However, perhaps we should not view this only as a gender issue, maybe the issue is really just about bullying and abuse rather than the gender identity of the victim and oppressor? In our universities there are plenty of examples of exploitative academics who demand that their PhD students and other researchers submit their work as secondary authors to the ‘guiding professor’. Some senior academics are well known to bully their supposed ‘collaborators’ into ceding primary authorship to someone who has done little or no work. If we just reflect on Sontag’s miserable experience as something about gender, something about a domestic relationship or something about a culture of time, then we miss recognising that she represents the tip of an iceberg. Such abuse is systemic and to be found everywhere in our intellectual institutions. ID9769003 Report Guardian Pick Share on Twitter Timeforpud | Pick 4 5 catbirdfarm GeoffHa 2 3 No I’m not. Twitter Share Share on Facebook 8 9 Facebook Facebook Share on Pinterest highhhness Facebook Reply | Pick Share SmugBug | Pick Share Report Share on Facebook 14 May 2019 5:10 gbarron0077 | Pick 13 May 2019 23:53 13 May 2019 Twitter Share on Twitter The author is over interpreting, I think Susan would be against that. Poor puns aside, SS’s other essays had quite an impact, she doesn’t need any more accolades, or hair splitting to put her on the intellectual map of XXc. From the article it seems that probably Rieff had developed a thesis and Susan may have voiced it, she was an exceedingly eloquent writer. Reply 14 May 2019 1:25 10 11 Reply Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook Report RobertJames Report Facebook Twitter When somebody says they are writing for ten hours a day that is not merely being a stenographer. Further, it is claimed that Rieff used the book to forge a career and bullied Sontag into signing over all rights as part of a child custody case which is blackmail. Finally, a biography is not about accolades it is about accounting for all the person in questions work and relationships. Sontag’s relationship with Rieff is significant. Facebook Report peacefulmilitant Twitter Report Share 14 May 2019 9:43 ninjamia Report SmileyFace2 14 May 2019 1:59 | Pick 14 May 2019 5:56 Reply Report 1 2 Setting aside the major issues here, I congratulate the Guardian on using Peter Hujar’s portrait; a nice nod to a (till lately) much-underrated American photographer; SS wrote the foreword to his 1975 book Portraits of Life and Death. “..and in marrying him and adding to his work, she clearly saw something in his ideas” Sontag married her sociology teacher at 17 years of age, ten days after she met him. In 2019 that relationship would not be championed it would in fact see Rieff dismissed from his job. Twitter Facebook Share Twitter | Pick Report Reply Share Share on Twitter bollybollo Report Guardian Pick Share on Twitter 8 9 Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 3:40 Show 1 more reply Report Guardian Pick Firstact | Pick Facebook 24 25 | Pick Reply … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Report Reply unthreaded 1 14 May 2019 6:37 14 May 2019 1:38 deadgod Share Share on Twitter Firstact Twitter | Pick Share on Twitter Show 16 more replies Gelion | Pick Report Reply Topics Share on Twitter Share | Pick 3 4 Facebook Reply WilliamCarlos ninjamia This article is more than 2 months old Biscuit74 Twitter 26 27 Report Reply Facebook Susan Sontag was true author of ex-husband’s book, biography claims | Pick Benjamin is normally a “he”. Are you saying it’s a “she”? Threads collapsed Twitter | Pick JayThomas Mon 13 May 2019 10.25 EDT Share on Facebook 3 4 Report Share on Twitter Share Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. | Pick Facebook Share on Messenger Share Report Share on Twitter 0 1 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook cossackathon Report 14 May 2019 5:03 Share on Twitter 9 10 Share dyon This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. 14 May 2019 5:28 uraniaargus Twitter Jump to comment Share Report Reply 14 May 2019 26 27 Reply Share on Twitter Report Facebook Share on Twitter 14 May 2019 2:09 Reply Share on Facebook Are you kidding? Twitter Andrew Roberts Bold claims about supposedly new insights boost sales, that’s as true for biographies as for journalism in general.Additionally, the theme of a brilliant woman supposedly or really being held back by a man probably plays well with prospective readers and publishers.The evidence seems to be somewhat flimsy, though. Less a rigorous examination of the oeuvres of both authors but rather anecdotal hearsay from Sontag’s friends only. Reply Are you sure the biographer didn’t consult stylometrists and other linguistic analysts? Reply Report | Pick Facebook Literally no one was presenting it as gendered. Share on Facebook Report Share | Pick 14 May 2019 0:21 Share on Facebook Share 37 38 | Pick | Pick david baker Twitter 2 3 25 26 Share on Twitter Report Reply heartman Not a fan who praise one envies, is it. Andrew Roberts ‘Forgive me, please,’ begged her ex-husband … Susan Sontag, in 1975.Photograph: Peter Hujar Archive/courtesy Pace MacGill gallery Share on Twitter | Pick At least within this article there is no comparison of the book in question with Rieff’s other writing. 18 19 Twitter Share Share on Facebook Reply | Pick Share on Facebook Twitter Report Share on Twitter 5 6 Report | Pick 14 May 2019 6:42 2 3 All Show 1 more reply 13 May 2019 22:52 Share on Facebook Report Facebook heartman Close report comment form Since you’re here… And … This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Share on Facebook 4 5 Mohsin Wadee 14 May 2019 9:59 WilliamCarlos | Pick Reply Share Report Facebook WilliamCarlos There is beauty and pathos in art and recognition of greatness. Sadly the everyday tragedies and pathos of family court doesnt compare. 14 May 2019 3:01 Twitter wattlesong MatticoyOfMindanao I’ve loved Susan Sontag since I first read Against Interpretation. She had a beautiful prose style and a brilliant mind. Everything she wrote was quotable: “I envy paranoids; they actually feel people are paying attention to them.” It was very gracious of her to let her husband take sole credit for Freud to which it appears she contributed. She must have loved him very much at this period in her life to let him take all the limelight. Perhaps working on this book prepared her for all the wonderful books and essays she would write. Share Gosh what a portrait. Fully clothed and yet so sensuous. Certainly much better than anything Annie came up with, particularly the photograph of the deceased Sontag. Facebook Wha? Did you not read the part about “acrimonious divorce.” He wanted the sole credit in exchange for not seeking custody of their child. Facebook Twitter Jump to comment Twitter bollybollo 70 71 Twitter Facebook Facebook 13 May 2019 23:43 Share on Twitter Twitter I don’t know much about Sontag or her work, but a lexical analysis of the book whose authorship is disputed and comparisons with the same of other books by Sontag and by her ex-husband would probably settle the question. The biographer should have asked linguists who do this sort of thing for help, because such a result would have made his case stronger. Share 14 May 2019 3:29 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Unpick 14 May 2019 3:51 Report Twitter 14 May 2019 5:25 13 14 Share Jump to comment Twitter Facebook | Pick 2 14 May 2019 1:03 Share on Facebook SlumVictim 14 May 2019 5:48 I don’t doubt it. It is like reverse Mary Shelley. Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share Theendtimes Share on Facebook Twitter mythology Share | Pick 6 7 | Pick NuvoPravda Share Facebook 0 1 Twitter Reply Twitter Share on Facebook Twitter Share Reply | Pick Twitter Show 1 more reply How many other instances of the appropriation of women’s work by talentless men have been buried? It is a tale as old as human society. That’s what I was thinking. Did Meg have the inside story? Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Share on Facebook 6 7 peacefulmilitant Im a monday person myself. Twitter Report View more commentslast_img read more

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