18 Jan
2020

Lomachenko stops Linares in 10th, wins lightweight title

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Spieth finishes with flurry, notches best round at Players China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls LATEST STORIES Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “I prepared for the last few rounds, and my father told me, ‘You need to go to the body,’” Lomachenko said. His father, Anatoly Lomachenko, is his trainer.Linares knocked down Lomachenko in the sixth and the fight was all even after nine rounds before Lomachenko (11-1, 9 KOs) put an overpowering end to his first fight at 135 pounds, adding that title to his belts at 126 and 130 pounds.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownLinares (44-4, 27 KOs) hadn’t lost since 2012 and used his size advantage to do some damage, but in the end Lomachenko did more in an exciting Madison Square Garden match.The fighter widely known as Vasyl said this week he prefers to use Vasiliy, his legal name. And now he can be called lightweight champion after picking up the WBA’s version of the belt in front of a crowd of 10,429 that chanted “Loma! Loma!” as he made his ring walk — which came first for a change since he was the challenger — and waved blue and gold flags for much of the night.center_img Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Linares landed the fight’s first noticeable punches early in the second round but Lomachenko began to get dialed in later in the round, and Linares’ face showed some frustration by the end of the third as Lomachenko kept landing quick combinations and dancing out of the way when Linares fired back.Lomachenko ended the fifth with another flurry and his manager, Egis Klimas, stood in the corner smiling and nodding his head, knowing he has someone special.But the smiling stopped in the sixth, when Linares knocked Lomachenko down with a straight right hand in the final minute of the round. Lomachenko got up easily and didn’t appear hurt, but Linares carried the confidence from the knockdown into a strong seventh round.“That right hand, it was a great punch. It happens,” Lomachenko said.Lomachenko regrouped to win the eighth but Linares responded with a strong ninth, landing a strong combination that seemed to momentarily hurt Lomachenko. But that was his last highlight.Lomachenko arrived at the arena to find a personalized Knicks jersey hanging in his locker and the crowd that included new Knicks coach David Fizdale roared when clips of him warming up were shown on the arena’s video screens.But unlike when he fought at the smaller Theater inside MSG in December in his last bout, a sixth-round stoppage of the smaller Guillermo Rigondeaux, this time Lomachenko faced a bigger man and a much bigger test.“Linares is a great champion,” he said, “and the fight was good for the fans and everybody.” It was Lomachenko’s eighth straight victory by stoppage, but this one was much tougher than a recent stretch of clinics in which his last four fights ended when his opponents’ corners wouldn’t let them take more punishment from the Ukrainian.Lomachenko had joked he should be called “no mas Chenko” for his habit of making opponents quit, but Linares made him earn this victory.The Venezuelan was on a 13-fight winning streak and was giving the two-time Olympic gold medalist the test he wanted, one that he said would bring out the best in what many already consider the most skilled fighter in the world.Each fighter was ahead 86-84 on a judge’s card, while Julie Lederman had it 85-all after nine rounds.Lomachenko said Thursday he needed to finally be put in danger to show his complete array of skills, and then on display in the 10th round with a series of shots that Linares couldn’t defend, especially the left to his midsection that took the biggest toll.ADVERTISEMENT Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NEW YORK, NY – DECEMBER 09: Vasiliy Lomachenko celebrates his Junior Lightweight bout victory over Guillermo Rigondeaux at Madison Square Garden on December 9, 2017 in New York City. Steven Ryan/Getty Images/AFPNEW YORK — Vasiliy Lomachenko stopped Jorge Linares in the 10th round of their lightweight championship fight Saturday night, winning a title in his third weight class in just his 12th pro bout.Lomachenko landed a hard left to the body during a flurry of precision punches that sent Linares went to a knee. Linares finally got up just as the count was reaching 10 but referee Ricky Gonzalez called an end to the fight at 2:08 of the round.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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25 Dec
2019

Rocket rejuvenated

first_imgCHICAGO – Roger Clemens is the old stubbly face in a World Series filled with bubbly newcomers. He has had more farewell seasons than the Houston Astros and Chicago White Sox have World Series titles, more awards than every other player on both rosters combined. And tonight, the 43-year-old Rocket will start for the Astros in his hometown team’s World Series debut, opposed by former Yankees teammate Jose Contreras. “It kind of gives me the old feeling back in the Yankees’ days,” Koby said. “The atmosphere in the clubhouse is awesome. It’s even better in the hometown.” Born 46 days after his father made his World Series debut with the 1986 Boston Red Sox, Koby signed with the Astros in July. He hit .297 with four homers and 17 RBI in 33 games for the Rookie League Greeneville Astros and .281 with six RBI in nine games with the Class-A Tri-City Valley Cats. “I’ve got three more behind him that care far more that I see them hit a double or make a big tackle than go out here and shake hands,” Clemens said, referring to sons Kory (17), Kacy (11) and Kody (9). “But they also get to share and reap the benefits of all this happening now, too. They get to see dad go out here and do this one more time.” Koby would rather watch than be watched. “It’s a lot more fun to watch him play and doing what he’s doing right now at age 43,” he said. “It’s just remarkable. Usually athletes are long done with their career by then. His work ethic and everything have just been awesome.” Clemens said in 2003 that his career was over, but Pettitte’s decision to sign with the Astros that fall sparked him come out of retirement to pitch alongside his buddy. He won his seventh Cy Young Award in 2004, when Houston came a win short of reaching the World Series, Clemens losing Game 7 at St. Louis. He came back again this year, pitched through the death of his mother, Bess, and led the major leagues in ERA (1.87) for the first time since 1990. The 15-year gap between ERA titles was double the previous high, set by the Braves’ Warren Spahn in 1947 and 1953. He could become the first 300-game winner to get a World Series victory since Grover Cleveland Alexander in 1926 and the oldest pitcher to win a World Series game, 15 days more senior than Dolf Luque, who got the win for the New York Giants in the finale of the 1933 Series against Washington. Clemens and Luque share Aug. 4 as their birthday. Luque was born in Havana, also the birthplace of Contreras, who played with Clemens on the 2003 Yankees. “I have to thank Roger very much because in Cuba I was throwing a two-seam fastball and he taught me how to throw a four-seam fastball,” Contreras said through a translator. “Every time I did something wrong with my mechanics, he helped he correct my errors.” Several Chicago players have done well against Clemens, who has been hampered slightly by a groin problem. Cleanup hitter Paul Konerko hits him as if the Rocket were pitching batting practice: 8-for-18 with five doubles, two homers and five RBI. He doesn’t think any injury would slow Clemens down. “I’m sure if he had a broken leg, he’d figure out how to get some people out,” Konerko said. Although A.J. Pierzynski is 1-for-11 against Clemens during the regular season, he hit a solo homer off him for Minnesota against the Yankees in Game 4 of the 2003 American League division series. “Other than that, I haven’t had a lot of success off him,” Pierzynski said. “A lot of good memories for him and bad memories for me.” Clemens was pleased with the perseverance of the Astros, not himself. Houston is the first team to make the World Series after falling 15 games under .500 since the 1914 Boston Braves. He made sure his sons paid attention. “They learned a life-long lesson this year, after where we’ve come from,” he said. “If you asked me in April or May if it was the right decision, I might have laughed at you.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “It gets you really amped up again,” he said before Friday’s workout. “I’m excited about it. I ponder to myself this could be my last couple of starts – or your last one.” When last seen on the World Series stage, he exited to more popping strobes than a supermodel. Even opposing players applauded during Game 4 in Miami when he came out of the New York Yankees’ extra-inning loss to the Marlins. center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “I wasn’t ready for all the flashes,” Clemens said. But that wasn’t the end. If Houston winds up winning this World Series, the best was yet to come. Although this is his sixth Series, Saturday night will be the first time he’s pitched an opener. “It comes with a lot of responsibility,” he said, sounding as if he was carrying the entire state of Texas on his back. “I know that so many people are counting on me, and I enjoy that. I expect it, but it’s the career I’ve led. So here we go again.” He wore a three-piece striped suit when he walked into the visitor’s clubhouse, several days of beard growth darkening his face. In the locker between his and Andy Pettitte’s, already dressed in an Astros’ uniform, was 18-year-old Koby Clemens, his oldest son. last_img read more

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