18 Nov
2020

Human H5N1 cases reported in China, Thailand

first_imgDec 9, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Two more human cases of H5N1 avian influenza have been confirmed, one in a Chinese woman who has recovered and the other in a 5-year-old Thai boy who died Dec 7, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced today.The cases increase the human toll of the virus over the past 2 years to 137 cases, including 70 deaths, according to the WHO. Exposure to poultry is the suspected cause in both of the latest cases.In China, a 31-year-old female farmer from the northeastern province of Liaoning became ill Oct 30 and was treated for severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress before she recovered, the WHO said, citing the Chinese Ministry of Health. She was discharged from a hospital Nov 29.The woman initially tested negative for the virus, but a microneutralization test for H5N1 antibodies later was positive, the WHO reported. “Using this test, a positive diagnosis is made when antibody levels in a blood sample taken late in illness are at least four times higher than those found in a sample taken early in illness,” the agency said. Antibody tests are reliable but slower than direct tests for viral RNA, the statement said.Investigators have linked the woman’s illness to exposure to sick poultry, the WHO said. Poultry outbreaks of H5N1 flu have occurred in Liaoning province. Contacts of the patient were under medical observation, but all remained healthy and have been released.China now has had five confirmed human cases of H5N1 infection, of which two were fatal.In Thailand, health officials confirmed that avian flu caused the death of a 5-year-old boy from the central province of Nakhonnayok, according to the WHO. The boy fell ill on Nov 25, was hospitalized Dec 5, and died 2 days later.Early results of an investigation suggest the boy might have been infected by contact with dead chickens in his neighborhood, the WHO said. Family and neighbors were placed under observation and have stayed healthy so far.Thailand has had five confirmed human cases this year, with two deaths. The country’s total for the past 2 years is 22 cases with 14 deaths.Other news on avian flu comes from Ukraine, Turkey, Zimbabwe, Vietnam, and Japan.Ukraine’s agriculture minister said H5N1 has been confirmed in the Crimean peninsula, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report today. The minister, Olexandre Baranivsky, said the confirmation came today but gave no details.A health ministry statement earlier today said 17 villages in the Crimea, including some near the central city of Simferopol, have had massive deaths among poultry, according to AFP. Previously the disease had been detected only in the northeast corner of the peninsula.Samples from nine villages had been sent to labs in Britain, Italy, and Russia, the story said.In Turkey, officials have claimed victory over avian flu after testing thousands of birds, according to another AFP report. The country’s agriculture ministry reported to the European Union and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) that the virus has been “completely eradicated.”H5N1 infection was discovered in poultry in Balikesir province on Oct 5. More than 10,000 birds were slaughtered in the area, and about 3,000 birds from Balikesir and around the country have been tested, with no cases found, the story said.However, veterinary experts believe Turkey faces a continued threat of outbreaks because it lies on bird migration routes, according to AFP.Vietnam has been hit by new avian flu outbreaks in two provinces, AFP reported yesterday. An outbreak in Son La province in the north triggered the culling of more than 500 ducks, and 5,000 ducks were destroyed after an outbreak on a farm in the central province of Quang Tri.In Zimbabwe, an H5N2 flu virus has been found on two ostrich farms, according to an AFP report yesterday. H5N2 is a milder strain than H5N1 and is not considered dangerous to humans.The report said Zimbabwe has suspended ostrich and poultry exports and quarantined all ostrich farms. Officials said no poultry outbreaks have been found.An H5N2 outbreak in South Africa last year triggered the killing of 26,000 ostriches, AFP reported.In Japan, evidence of an H5 virus has been found in an area previously hit by H5N2 outbreaks in poultry, AFP reported today. Authorities have ordered the destruction of 19,000 chickens at the site in Ibaraki prefecture near Tokyo.Chickens on the farm tested positive for an antibody indicating previous exposure to an H5 virus, said the report, which cited Kyodo News as its source.See also:Dec 9 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_12_09/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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23 Sep
2020

First visit to Siskiyou worth $3,000 to Rod Restad Memorial winner Hogge

first_imgBobby Hogge IV was the $3,000 Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified feature winner at Siski­you Motor Speedway’s Rod Restad Memorial. The Saturday checkers were Hogge’s 13th of the season. (Photo courtesy of Siskiyou Motor Speedway)YREKA, Calif. (Sept. 24) – Win number 13 on the season was worth $3,000 for Bobby Hogge IV.Hogge ventured to Siskiyou Motor Speedway for Saturday’s Rod Restad Memorial and led all 30 laps in the Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modified feature.A rash of early cautions slowed the main event but the race ended with 20-plus green flag cir­cuits. Alex Stanford was second and Ryan McDaniel ended in third.“This was the first time I’d even seen the track,” said Hogge, who drew the pole start. “I ran the lower line and Alex and Ryan were pretty close behind.”“When I got to lapped traffic, I just made sure I knew where they were going,” he added. “I figured with those two behind me, I didn’t have a lot of room to make any mistakes.”Second place paid $2,000 and third paid $1,000. Jeremy Richey and Mark Wauge completed the top five.Hogge was already on the ballot for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. The Restad Memorial was already his fourth qualifying event victory since the first week of August.Feature results – 1. Bobby Hogge IV; 2. Alex Stanford; 3. Ryan McDaniel; 4. Jeremy Richey; 5. Mark Wauge; 6. Zach Fettinger; 7. Monte Bischoff; 8. Albert Gill; 9. Nick Trenchard; 10. Lenny Toolanen; 11. Manny Freeman; 12. Duane Cleveland; 13. James Anderson; 14. Dan Thomas; 15. Adam Walters; 16. Tom Berry Jr.; 17. Larry McCracken; 18. Duane Orsburn.last_img read more

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4 Aug
2020

Little Silver’s Riccio Lauded in Sports Betting Decision

first_imgBy Jay Cook |LITTLE SILVER – Ronald J. Riccio can recall spending days at Monmouth Park as an eight-year-old boy, watching alongside his father and his father’s best friend as thoroughbreds sprinted around the track.The racetrack’s never been more than a few miles away from his Little Silver home.But Riccio, now 71, has supported the Oceanport racing institution in a different manner over the past few years. He had turned his weekend racing program in for an extensive law brief as the lead counsel for the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, representing Monmouth Park, through the Murphy v. NCAA Supreme Court case fighting for legalized sports betting.After a decision disbanding the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) of 1992 was decided Monday from the court – meaning all states can have a legal and regulated sports wagering industry – Riccio was relieved to know his beloved venue will not be shuttering any time soon.“I know so many people over there, many of my best friends I met at Monmouth Park,” Riccio told The Two River Times on Tuesday. “To be able to have a hand in keeping a place that holds so many memories for me alive and to help it flourish is just icing on the cake.”Riccio is a former dean of Seton Hall University School of Law from 1988 to 1999 and has been practicing law for well over four decades. Murphy v. NCAA was his first case in front of the Supreme Court, but Riccio said he never felt the nerves nor wavered in his support of Monmouth Park.The crux of the case was based on overturning PASPA, a federal law which allowed sports betting only in Nevada and three other states. New Jersey had tried since 2011 to permit legalized sports betting after a statewide referendum permitted lawmakers to legalize it but was challenged twice by the four major professional sports leagues and the NCAA in the coming years. Lawmakers had crafted two bills and even suffered a veto from then-Gov. Chris Christie throughout that time.Though above all, Murphy v. NCAA “is a landmark decision,” said Riccio. “The effect of the decision is to narrow the federal government’s power and to expand the state’s sovereign rights to regulate its people as it wants to regulate them.”Riccio, who taught constitutional law for over 20 years at Seton Hall University, said this case could have major implications with future states’ rights issues currently in the news. Decisions down the road on marijuana legalization, sanctuary city creation and environmental regulations could reference this sports betting case.But the immediate impact will be on Monmouth Park as it’s set to take New Jersey’s first legal sports wagers later this summer. Predictions are that sports betting in New Jersey could be a $10 billion industry, some estimate.“Monmouth Park has been for several years trying to stay alive as a viable, self-sustaining racetrack that employs hundreds of people, that has a huge impact on the state economy, on the preservation of open spaces,” said Riccio.“Just to be able to relieve the anxiety that all the workers over there were feeling about the future of Monmouth Park, to me, that’s as gratifying as anything else,” he added.While the four major sports leagues and the state’s high-priced legal representation captured interest, it was Riccio and his team at McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney and Carpenter who helped lay the legal groundwork for the case, said Edward B. Deutsch, founder and managing partner of the firm.“Ron and our people, the brief work and the strategy, was brilliant,” Deutsch told The Two River Times this week. “I think that he and our team, more than anybody, is responsible for this result.”Deutsch said Riccio is “the best constitutional lawyer in New Jersey.”Former state Sen. Joseph Kyrillos Jr., who sponsored state bills in support of legalized sports betting, said the Supreme Court decision “will create jobs, revitalize our horse industry and boost tourism for the areas surrounding Monmouth Park.”Kyrillos added that “few understand it was Dean Ron Riccio and the McElroy Deutsch law firm that forced this outcome.”last_img read more

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