10 Aug
2019

A must for all golfers both green and experienced

first_imgA must for all golfers both green and experienced, The Golf Guide published by FHG is a comprehensive book that tells you exactly where to tee off and where to stay on golf courses across Britain and Ireland. RelatedCool Courses: weird and wonderful golfing around the worldCool Courses: weird and wonderful golfing around the worldTop 10 Golf Resorts in Europe: Start the New Golf Season in StyleTop 10 Golf Resorts in Europe: Start the New Golf Season in StyleGolf Guide Winners announcedGolf Guide Winners announced Now in its 34th year of publication, the guide includes details on almost 2800 courses, along with golfing events for each region. Each entry includes all the vital information a dedicated golfer needs to know: location of course, number of holes, standard scratch score, green fees, as well as details of nearby accommodation and even non-golfing facilities for those who aren’t so keen on putting and par.More info: The Golf GuideReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Maplast_img read more

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10 Aug
2019

March 31 2008 Soleri Studios Scottsdale aka C

first_imgMarch 31, 2008 Soleri Studios Scottsdale, aka Cosanti, has been buzzing with spring activity. On Saturday, March 29, it was the site of “The Desert Environment and Urban Sprawl”, a panel discussion with Paolo Soleri, Arizona photographer The event was organized by alumnus Alex Barragan [right photo]. Opening and closing the event was music by Dennis Yee on cello, accompanied by Pinna Joseph [left photo]. Ms. Joseph is the owner of the event’s co-sponsor, Tempe’s “Changing Hands” bookstore. [Photos: tt & text: Amber Klatt] The gentlemen, moderated by local architect Vern Swaback, spoke about the necessary ecological considerations that must be part of current city planning. Instigated by a particularly engaged audience, the artists returned to the topic of a light rail system. And, at the reminding of Arcosanti Site Coordinator Mary Hoadley, there was mention of Soleri’s concept of the Lean Linear City, in which city limits would stream alongside a transportation route. Thank you to everyone who was part of this successful afternoon. We look forward to seeing you at Sundays with Soleri, an afternoon discussion with Paolo Soleri occurring Sundays at 3pm at Cosanti. [Photo: tt & text: Amber Klatt]last_img read more

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7 Aug
2019

Amazon has agreed to buy Twitch a video platform

first_imgAmazon has agreed to buy Twitch, a video platform and community for videogame enthusiasts, for US$970 million in cash. The deal follows reports from May that linked YouTube to the videogame site, with Google-owned YouTube said to be ready to imminently announce an acquisition for a similar US$1 billion price tag.Announcing the deal, Amazon said that Twitch had more than 55 million unique visitors in July, who viewed more than 15 billion minutes of content on the site, produced by more than 1 million broadcasters.US-based Twitch launched in June 2011 is used by gamers to live-broadcast, watch and chat about videogames. Users can stream their gameplay direct from their connected Xbox or PlayStation consoles.Amazon said that the site is also used by publishers, developers, media outlets, conventions and e-sports organisations – as well as by individual gamers.“Broadcasting and watching gameplay is a global phenomenon and Twitch has built a platform that brings together tens of millions of people who watch billions of minutes of games each month – from The International, to breaking the world record for Mario, to gaming conferences like E3. And, amazingly, Twitch is only three years old,” said Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos.“Like Twitch, we obsess over customers and like to think differently, and we look forward to learning from them and helping them move even faster to build new services for the gaming community.”Twitch CEO Emmett Shear added: “Being part of Amazon will let us do even more for our community. We will be able to create tools and services faster than we could have independently. This change will mean great things for our community, and will let us bring Twitch to even more people around the world.”Twitch’s shareholders have approved the cash deal, which is expected to close in the second half of 2014, subject to customary closing conditions.last_img read more

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7 Aug
2019

UK broadcast regulator has appointed Philip Schles

first_imgUK broadcast regulator has appointed Philip Schlesinger, a professor in cultural policy at the University of Glasgow, to its content board to represent the interests of people in Scotland. Schlesinger takes up his now role on the content board on December 1, and will hold the position for three years. He has been on Ofcom’s Advisory Committee for Scotland since 2004 and has been its chairman since 2009 – a role he will continue until the end of the year.Ofcom’s content board is the committee of the main Ofcom board with delegated responsibility for TV and radio content issues – including setting and enforcing quality and standards. It includes members who represent each of the four nations of the UK.last_img

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3 Aug
2019

Hopes were dashed this week that the United States

first_imgHopes were dashed this week that the United States was finally making progress in the fight against childhood obesity.Contrary to previous reports, the epidemic of fat has not abated. In fact, there’s been a big jump in obesity among the nation’s youngest children, according to the latest analysis of federal data, published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.”The main take-home message for me is that, clearly, obesity remains a problem,” says Asheley Skinner, an associate professor of population health services at Duke University and leader of the analysis. “It’s not improving.”Childhood obesity rates have been rising for decades, sparking widespread alarm among public health researchers and officials. Obese children tend to become obese adults, who are prone to many health problems, including cancer, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.But hopes rose several years ago that the epidemic might be ebbing, at least in some parts of the country. Some researchers suggested efforts such as Michelle’s Obama’s Let’s Move campaign might be working.Unfortunately, that doesn’t appear to be the case, Skinner and her colleagues discovered when they analyzed the latest national data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The NHANES survey is one of the federal government’s main measures of childhood obesity.The latest analysis shows that the percentage of children ages 2 to 19 who are obese increased from 14 percent in 1999 to 18.5 percent in 2015 and 2016.Moreover, there was no statistical difference in the overall obesity rate between the 2013-2014 and 2015-2016 surveys — undercutting hopes that obesity had begun to decline in recent years.In fact, the scientists say, there was a disturbingly large increase in obesity among the youngest children — ages 2 to 5 years old. In that age group, obesity increased from about 9 percent to almost 14 percent.”It is a big jump,” Skinner says. “That’s the highest level of obesity that we’ve seen in 2- to 5-year-olds since 1999.”The increase more than makes up for any decrease that may have occurred in the previous survey, Skinner says.”Obesity in the youngest group is a concern,” she says, “because when obesity starts younger, most of these children continue to have obesity throughout childhood and into adulthood. “The earlier you start seeing this, the harder it is to address it for these kids.””We have known about this epidemic of childhood obesity — and have been pouring research dollars and public health dollars into this problem — for at least 20 years,” says Dr. Sarah Armstrong, an associate professor of pediatrics at Duke who helped conduct the analysis. “And despite that, we don’t seem to be making a big dent in the situation.””We need to double down our efforts and find out what’s going to work,” she says, “or the health of our future generation is really in jeopardy.”In an editorial accompanying the study, Dr. David Ludwig of Boston Children’s Hospital calls for a more comprehensive national strategy for fighting the problem.”We haven’t generated a truly systematic or comprehensive approach across society that addresses all drivers of childhood obesity — poor diet, a lack of physical activity and a healthy food supply that will encourage everyone to eat well,” Ludwig says. “We need a truly national, comprehensive strategy to tackle this epidemic.”Hispanic and African-American children continue to be much more likely to become obese than white children, the analysis shows.Melinda Sothern, director of behavioral and community health sciences at Louisiana State University, suggests that trend may be the result of a “perfect storm” of stress, which, when combined with a “lack of access to healthy foods and opportunities for outdoor play,” can affect biology on a genetic level. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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3 Aug
2019

Theres more bad news about the nations devastati

first_imgThere’s more bad news about the nation’s devastating opioid epidemic.In just one year, overdoses from opioids jumped by about 30 percent, according to a report released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The overall increase in opioid overdoses seen in hospital emergency rooms between the third quarter of 2016 and the third quarter of 2017 occurred across the nation. Some parts of the country experienced far greater increases, while a few have reported declines, the analysis shows.”We have an emergency on our hands,” says acting CDC Director Anne Schuchat. “The fast-moving opioid overdose epidemic continues and is accelerating.”The largest regional increase occurred in the Midwest, which saw a 69.7 percent jump in opioid overdoses, according to the report. The jump was driven in part by a 109 percent increase in Wisconsin. Overdoses increased 40.3 percent in the West, 21.3 percent in the Northeast, 20.2 percent in the Southwest and 14 percent in the Southeast.”We saw, sadly, that in every region, in every age group of adults, in both men and women, overdoses from opioids are increasing,” Schuchat says.The latest data could underestimate the overdoses, because many people who overdose never end up in the emergency room. “It might be even worse,” Schuchat says.The report didn’t specify why overdoses vary across the country. But one factor is probably the differences in availability of newer, highly potent illegal opioids, such as fentanyl, which have been flooding the country in recent years, Schuchat says.”We think that the number of people addicted to opioids is relatively stable. But the substances are more dangerous than five years ago,” Schuchat says. “The margin of error for taking one of these substances is small now and people may not know what they have.”The supply of those more dangerous drugs is increasing faster in some parts of the country than in others, which may help explain the geographic variations, Schuchat says.”Overall as a nation, we are still failing to adequately respond to the opioid addiction epidemic,” says Dr. Andrew Kolodny, co-director of opioid policy research at Brandeis University. “It is concerning that 20 years into this epidemic, it is still getting worse. The number of Americans experiencing opioid overdoses is still increasing.”Although the Trump administration recently declared the epidemic to be an emergency, a significant increase in funding is urgently needed to treat Americans addicted to opioids. Kolodny says.”It’s kind of like pointing to a burning building and saying, ‘Oh, there’s a fire there. There’s an emergency.’ And then not calling the fire department and watching it burn down,” Kolodny says. “There’s been a lot of talk from Congress and from the administration and a recognition that we need to do something about this problem. But nothing yet has happened.”Others say the key is integrating addiction treatment better into the health care system. For example, emergency room staff need better training to make sure people with substance-use disorder get follow-up addiction treatment, says Jessica Hulsey Nickel, president and chief executive officer of the Addiction Policy Forum. Too often, addicts are simply revived and sent home without follow-up care, only to overdose again, she says.”We can use this near-death experience — use it as moment to change that person’s life,” Nickel says.The latest analysis is an attempt by the CDC to track the opioid epidemic more closely, Schuchat says. Previously, the agency looked at death from opioids, which lag behind reports from emergency rooms.”We wanted more timely information,” Schuchat says.The analysis was based on about 91 million emergency room visits that occurred between July 2016 and September 2017, including 142,557 visits that were suspected opioid overdoses.That survey showed an increase of 29.7 percent in 52 jurisdictions in 45 states between July through September 2016 and the same period in 2017, according to the report.The researchers also analyzed 45 million emergency department visits that occurred in 16 states during the same period, which included 119,198 suspected opioid overdoses.That analysis showed a 34.5 percent increase between the same periods in 2016 and 2017. But those increases varied dramatically from state to state, even within a region.For example, overdoses increased 105 percent in Delaware, compared with 80.6 percent in Pennsylvania and 34 percent in Maine. Overdoses may have actually slightly decreased in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island. In Kentucky, the CDC’s analysis showed a 15 percent drop in overdoses. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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3 Aug
2019

Its a question that charities often debate How s

first_imgIt’s a question that charities often debate: How should their fund-raising ads portray the people they’re trying to help?If the ads display graphic human suffering to elicit donations, they run the risk of exploiting the subjects or making them look helpless.If the ads are more upbeat — showing aid recipients who are smiling, for example — they may ignore the subject’s strife and put the power to transform the subject’s life in the hands of rich, Western donors.While this dilemma is often discussed among charity professionals, the debate hasn’t always included the people in the images — the aid recipients themselves.So a group of researchers wanted to turn the tables. What do those who are supported by aid think? That’s the topic of a new survey, “Which Image Do You Prefer? A Study Of Visual Communications In Six African Countries.”The findings show a mixed bag of reactions from the survey respondents to 10 ads — but the most common emotion was sadness.”Right now, I feel like we are inferiors as a continent. It’s as if we are always begging,” said one 22-year-old Ethiopian man. “I understand that there are some of our people who are in need, who cannot even have a meal a day. But are we the only ones to whom that happens? The Western countries have problems, too.”Researchers from the University of East Anglia and Radi-Aid, a charity watchdog project of the Norwegian Students’ and Academics’ International Assistance Fund (SAIH), surveyed 74 people who live in communities supported by aid in Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zambia.The participants were asked to share their perceptions of ads from international aid groups like Oxfam, Save the Children and CARE. Three ads featured a positive subject — a smiling child, for example — three negative, three neutral and one without a person in it.A selection of responses were published anonymously in the report, as is standard practice with surveys, says David Girling, coauthor of the study and a lecturer at the School of International Development at the University of East Anglia.One of the favorites was from a global education charity called Dubai Cares. A little boy with a big smile holds a handmade yellow truck. The text on the ad says “I can teach you how to make a car from a plastic jug. Can you teach me to read?””I love this [Dubai Cares ad], it shows that Africa has something to give as much as most of the adverts that show Africa to be in a place where they always have to ask and always look up to other countries to help. We also have something we can give out, that is why I like this one.” – Female, 22, ZambiaAnother favorite came from Save the Children. A child refugee fleeing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is shown in a glass box, as if she were a museum artifact. The text reads, “We must make this a thing of the past.””I like the Save the Children advert. Because it depicts that these people have no home. They have no shelter and no refuge. They have no place where they can go or nobody they can look up to.” – Female, 52, MalawiOne of the lowest-ranked ads came from CARE International U.K. It depicts a child in a ragged T-shirt with a sad expression, carrying a small jug of water. One woman said she wanted to know the story behind the picture.”If you look at the child in the CARE advert, she is carrying a container of water, but we don’t know why … It has been [portrayed] as if the girl is suffering, but we don’t know because this is just a picture … I understand that maybe … if you bring such a picture, someone will feel sorry and give money.” – Female, 54, MalawiIn an email statement to NPR, Shabnam Amini from CARE International U.K. responded: “The CARE advert reviewed in Radi-Aid’s report is from 2013 … [and] is no longer used by CARE. While there is limited space in a print advert to tell somebody’s story, CARE ensured that additional information about the context and detail of Elsa’s story was held online at the time.”Other criticisms of the ads overall included a lack of diversity in age groups, ethnicity and occupation.”Out of 10 pictures, eight of them have used children. So why are they using children? And most of the children they are using are black. There are also white kids who are suffering. Why focus on kids as though it is the kids who are doing poverty? Why not cover their parents, or what they eat and where they live?” – Female, 48, South AfricaOne of the most heart-wrenching aspects of the survey was how sad the advertisements made the participants feel, says Girling. He traveled to a focus group taking place in Johannesburg and observed everyone as they looked over the ads for the first time.”People sat there shaking their heads in silence,” he says. “They felt sad that people in their own countries were suffering, and they didn’t have the ability to help them.””I went back to my hotel after that feeling quite choked myself,” he adds.Even though the images elicited feelings of sorrow, 71 percent of the respondents found that the ads were an accurate representation of Africa’s state of affairs.”If I look at all of these pictures that are in front of me, they are the things that are really going on in Africa. It’s really, really going on. You can see some countries fighting against each other, you can see some sickness too, you can see some people will be happy, so many different things.” – Male, 32, GhanaAnd the respondents generally agreed that using “negative imagery” — what the report defines as images of a person visibly suffering from war, famine or other crises — is an effective way “to pull on heartstrings to elicit a donation,” says Girling.”They said they need all the help they can get,” says Girling, who attended a few focus groups in person. “As long as the images were an accurate representation [of the issue] and didn’t exploit people, and the images didn’t involve nudity or bloodshed, then they were OK for [sad] pictures to be used.”That surprised Beathe Øgård, president of SAIH and the report’s co-author. These are precisely the types of images that her project Radi-Aid have been trying to eliminate from the aid sector.”Stereotypes and over-simplification [of development problems] create a skewed view of how Westerners look at Africa,” she says.But perhaps, she adds, it’s time “to start a new debate and reflect upon the findings we’ve seen. It should be possible to show both negative and positive imagery.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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31 Jul
2019

A series of offensive remarks made by a disabled M

first_imgA series of offensive remarks made by a disabled MP about other minority groups and women should end his political career, according to members of a disabled women’s collective.Sisters of Frida was among disabled groups and activists who spoke to Disability News Service (DNS) this week following revelations that Labour’s Jared O’Mara, now aged 35, had posted a string of homophobic, misogynist and racist comments on websites when he was in his 20s.The disabled MP was forced to resign from the Commons women and equalities committee after he apologised and admitted posting the comments, which had emerged through the political blog Guido Fawkes.But new concerns then emerged about further offensive comments O’Mara (pictured) was alleged to have made to a woman in a nightclub just seven months ago, comments he is reported to have denied making.Labour subsequently suspended him from the party and launched an inquiry into that incident, which is also likely to investigate the historic online comments.There has been little sympathy for O’Mara from prominent disabled campaigners this week.Eleanor Lisney, one of the founders of the disabled women’s collective Sisters of Frida, said they believed that O’Mara’s political career should now be over, although it was “up to his constituents” to decide on his future.But she added: “We don’t think he should be an MP if he has those kind of views.“He should know from lived experience how it feels like to have those kind of remarks said about you.”She said Sisters of Frida had ruled out any engagement with O’Mara, and added: “We don’t want to have anything to do with him.”She said members of Sisters of Frida were “disappointed” and “really surprised” that O’Mara managed to become an MP after previously making such misogynist, racist and homophobic comments.She said: “We can’t accept that kind of attitude. It’s not whether he said it 15 years ago or whether he said it now. It’s just not acceptable.”Lisney said Sisters of Frida believed the claims made by the woman who said O’Mara had directed offensive remarks at her in a nightclub earlier this year.And she said O’Mara had compounded the seriousness of those remarks by then calling the woman a liar.Stephen Brookes, a coordinator of the Disability Hate Crime Network, supported Labour’s decision to suspend O’Mara.He said that, as a disabled person, O’Mara should have been more aware of other equality issues.He said: “We must all remember that it wasn’t just a single throwaway remark or misguided joke.“If negative comments had been made about him or disability by one of the groups he has demeaned there would have been an outcry from all of us.“Seems we have someone who is only really sorry because they have been caught out. His suspension is absolutely justified.”Deborah King, co-founder of Disability Politics UK, said: “Jared O’Mara is entitled to due process and a fair hearing.“We will know after that whether he can be an important voice for disabled people in parliament.”She added: “Diversity and inclusion should be part of all politicians’ core values. Politicians need to be sensitive to all groups in society. The key words are dignity and respect.“All MPs need to get some good quality training which involves role play and self-assessment, not just a lecture.”Rebecca Boot, a disabled Labour party member, told DNS: “Jared O’Mara said some inexcusable things, which no one should be defending.“He says he no longer holds those views, but he needs to follow that up with substantive action.“All minority communities have experienced people just paying lip service to ‘change’ and are rightly sceptical of that.“O’Mara has been a good advocate for disabled people in parliament, highlighting the barriers in getting to elected office, issues with the practices of the House of Commons and the damage that austerity policies are inflicting on disabled people.“If he can prove that he has changed, that he no longer holds the homophobic and misogynist views that he did as a 21-year-old, and if the latest allegations are false, then I would welcome his continued involvement in disability politics.“However, we cannot throw women and LGBT+ people under the bus by allowing him to speak for disabled people if the pattern of his behaviour does not hold with his words.”Debbie Abrahams, Labour’s shadow work and pensions secretary, told DNS on Tuesday: “Anybody that makes any derogatory and discriminatory remarks must be held to account.”She said Labour was launching an investigation into the comments, but she added: “We must allow due process.”The following day, a Labour party spokeswoman confirmed that the investigation had been prompted by the allegations concerning the remarks made seven months ago.But she said it was likely that the investigation would also examine the historic comments he made on social media.She confirmed that O’Mara had been suspended from the party but would still be expected to vote on party lines.Earlier in the week, women and equalities minister Justine Greening said, in a letter to Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn: “Violent, sexist and homophobic language must have no place in our society, and parliamentarians of all parties have a duty to stamp out this sort of behaviour wherever we encounter it, and condemn it in the strongest possible terms.”She said the comments showed “the deep and persistent stain on Labour’s ability to represent women, the LGBT community and wider society”.Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable had called on Labour to withdraw the whip from O’Mara for his “completely unacceptable behaviour”.He said: “People must have confidence that MPs will stand up against prejudice. As MPs we cannot let ourselves fall short of those standards, particularly in our dealings with the public.”After the first – misogynistic – comments emerged, and he was forced to resign from the committee, O’Mara had released a statement saying that he was “deeply ashamed of the comments I made online” and that he understood “why they are offensive and sincerely apologise for my use of such unacceptable language”.He said: “I made the comments as a young man, at a particularly difficult time in my life, but that is no excuse.”He added: “Misogyny is a deep problem in our society. Since making those comments 15 years ago, I have learned about inequalities of power and how violent language perpetuates them.”The allegations have emerged only months after O’Mara won a shock election victory over former Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg in the Sheffield Hallam seat.There were hopes after his election that he would provide a strong new voice in parliament for disabled people.He said he wanted to highlight the impact of austerity on disabled people, and said Tory ministers had “completely torn up the welfare system” which had supported disabled people.He also accused the government of introducing policies inspired by “eugenics” in the hope that disabled people would “suffer and die”.O’Mara later told DNS that he wanted to see the House of Commons draw up a policy on bullying and harassment by MPs to prevent the kind of behaviour he had witnessed since joining parliament.And he said he wanted to “get some decorum and professionalism in the chamber and get it into the 21st century” and try to “make it a comfortable environment and make it an inclusive environment”.*The idea that different forms of oppression can combine and overlap, for example with the discrimination experienced by black women, or by gay disabled menlast_img read more

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26 Jul
2019

Sexist Job Ads Discriminate Against Women in China Even Specifying Applicants Required

first_img Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Add to Queue Job ads in China openly discriminate against women, regularly stating employers’ preference for male applicants.Some ads list a preference for men, others try to lure male applicants by describing the attractiveness of future female co-workers, while many more place unfair and unequal demands on women applicants.Analyzing more than 36,000 job ads from the last five years, Human Rights Watch released a new report on Monday detailing the extent of discriminatory job ads in China.”Nearly one in five job ads for China’s 2018 national civil service called for ‘men only’ or ‘men preferred,’ while major companies like Alibaba have published recruitment ads promising applicants ‘beautiful girls’ as co-workers,” Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch, said.In the past, Alibaba has repeatedly advertised “beautiful girls” or “goddesses” that work for the company in its job ads, and described them as “late night benefits.”But even in January this year, Alibaba advertised three roles primarily for men. An ad for a government affairs senior specialist stated “men preferred,” as did an ad for restaurant operations support, while the ad for a crowd-sourcing delivery manager said “men only.”Last year, advertisements for feed reviewers at Baidu, who were likely being hired for censorship-related work, listed “men” alongside other job requirements such as an associate’s degree. In 2016, a job ad for the company’s filming program manager job ad stated the role required “strong logical reasoning ability, effective execution skills … men and manly women [need apply].”In response to the new report, Baidu told AFP its the job ads have been removed while Alibaba said it would conduct “stricter reviews” of its ads going forwards but the ads referred to in the report were outdated.”Sexist job ads pander to the antiquated stereotypes that persist within Chinese companies,” Richardson said. “These companies pride themselves on being forces of modernity and progress, yet they fall back on such recruitment strategies, which shows how deeply entrenched discrimination against women remains in China.”Performance by government departments were no better.Out of all national civil service jobs that were reviewed so far this year, 19 percent included the terms “men only,” “men preferred” or “suitable for men.” There was just one instance of a job ad that required the applicant to be a woman.Last year, 55 percent of jobs advertised by the Ministry of Public Security specified “men only.”These ads typically state working conditions such as “frequent overtime,” “heavy workload” and “frequent travel” that appear to be the reason for excluding women. One ad in the ministry’s news department listed “need to work overtime frequently, high intensity work, only men need apply.”One job ad site has attempted to stop the sexist ads by banning gender discrimination phrases, but there are easy workarounds. Human Rights Watch found numerous uses of Chinese characters that sound like “man,” use a Romanized version or swap “man” out for other colloquial terms.Sexist job ads in China are not a recent problem.Research from 2013 found gender-targeted ads are common in China, and that an employer’s preference for a women workers is often related to their age, height and beauty rather than skill.There are often gender-specific criteria for women hires.If organizations do try to hire women, Human Rights Watch found employers often add in strict, gender-specific criteria regarding appearance, marital status, motherhood or even alter educational requirements.In Shaanxi province, researchers found the actual job title for female train conductors was “fashionable and beautiful high-speed train conductors.”Another ad for train conductors in Hebei required women to weigh “below 65 kilograms,” be between “162 centimeters to 173 centimeters” tall and have “normal facial features, no tattoos, no obvious scars on face, neck or arms, good skin tone, no incurable skin conditions.”At Alibaba, the sole job available in January that included the Chinese character for “woman” required the applicant to “possess fine personal image.”Other ads appear to indicate employers would prefer to avoid the hassle of maternity leave, particularly under China’s new two-child policy.One job ad listed “[Applicants must be] women married with children or men.” Another, for a senior manager position at an internet company, required a “female, married with children, excellent image and temperament.”Even Beijing court assistants, who were required to be female, needed to have “proper looks.”In a number of instances women were able to apply for jobs only if they had higher qualifications than their male counterparts. In one city looking to hire management assistants, 47 positions were open to men who had high school diplomas. Two of the three same positions open to women required an associate’s degree.China is still battling gender inequality.When China ended its one-child policy, state media declared women could now return to the home in order to “better raise children.”This belief closely aligns with what appears to be the state’s desire for women to marry and remain in the home. In 2015, Beijing’s office of marriage registration caused an uproar when one of its posters saying: “Being a good wife and good mother is the biggest achievement of a woman,” began circulating online.The pressure for women to marry is so great that those who are unmarried after 27 are considered “leftover women” and “spoiled goods.”When measured for gender equality, China ranks 100 out of 144 countries. Next Article –shares Tara Francis Chan Image credit: Greg Baker | Getty Images Register Now » Sexist Job Ads Discriminate Against Women in China — Even Specifying Applicants’ Required Height, Weight and Facial Structure 5 min read This story originally appeared on Business Insider China Many job ads in China openly discriminate against women according to research from Human Rights Watch. April 23, 2018 Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel.last_img read more

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26 Jul
2019

Researchers Find Uber Use Leads to a Decrease in DUI Deaths

first_img Add to Queue –shares 4 min read Next Article Image credit: Uber | Facebook Researchers Find Uber Use Leads to a Decrease in DUI Deaths Guest Writer Ray Hennessey Editor-at-Largecenter_img August 25, 2015 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Uber Uber may be saving your life.Researchers at Temple University ran an analysis and found that use of car-sharing services, and Uber in particular, led to a decrease in the number of homicides from drunken driving.Looking at data from 2009 through 2014 in California, Brad Greenwood and Sunil Wattal of the Fox School of Business said they found that Uber’s entry into a market reduced DUI deaths, depending on the service.Use of Uber X led to between a 3.6 percent and a 5.6 percent reduction in alcohol-related driving homicides. By noting that there are 13,000 DUI-related deaths a year, the researchers figure complete implementation of Uber X nationwide would save 500 lives annually and the economy $1.3 billion in losses. However, as the cost and complexity of service rose, Greenwood and Wattal found no drop.Uber itself has touted its own service as a way to ensure you have a car after an evening of being overserved by your bartender. In fact, earlier this year it set up a kiosk with a breathalyzer in bar-heavy Toronto as a marketing gimmick.The car-sharing industry has produced a number of studies, too, saying these services reduce DUIs, but Greenwood and Wattal seem to be the first to run independent data to confirm it.The taxi industry does not fare well in the Temple research, with moves by some cities to limit Uber’s entry by the more heavily regulated cab industry facing particular criticism. Those limits, the researchers note, are designed to “manufacture excess demand” and “the absence of a sufficient number of taxis may result in citizens operating motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol.” In other words, protecting the taxi industry by limiting competition means more drunk drivers are on the road.Related: Court Rules FTC Can Come After Your Company After a Cyber AttackWhat’s more, the researchers found that there was no evidence that non-alcohol-related auto accidents rose in areas where Uber operated. That seems to support those who fought New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s plan to limit the number of Uber drivers on the city, citing safety. De Blasio backed off on that proposal last month.Instead, the research suggests cities, rather than tightening regulations for new car services, might want to think about loosening more onerous regulations to help taxi companies compete.“Although the results of this investigation cannot speak to public welfare losses which may result from improper vehicle handling or safety on the part of consumers (although our results do not indicate an effect on sober deaths),” the authors wrote, “they provide important insights into the potential benefits of the sharing economy and inform licensed livery services of the necessary steps which need to be taken to compete with firms like Uber.”Finally, the researchers propose a little business proposition: Restaurants and bars should start signing up with Uber and other ride-sharing companies.“To the extent that vendors can be held culpable for overserving patrons, and to the degree that return business is vital for these firms, integration of Uber during the dining or event experience offers significant benefit for all parties,” Greenwood and Wattal wrote. “In particular, the vendor is able to eschew a significant liability risk, while still ensuring that her patrons do not endanger themselves. Moreover, as chauffeured service is often seen as a sign of prestige, there may be additional social externalities which accrue to both patron and vendor.”Related: Apple’s Tim Cook Made a Rookie Mistake and Might Face SEC Sanctions Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Register Now »last_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

1 in 6 insured hospital patients get a surprise bill for outofnetwork

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 20 2019About 1 in 6 Americans were surprised by a medical bill after treatment in a hospital in 2017 despite having insurance, according to a study published Thursday.On average, 16% of inpatient stays and 18% of emergency visits left a patient with at least one out-of-network charge. Most of those came from doctors offering treatment at the hospital, even when the patients chose an in-network hospital, according to researchers from the Kaiser Family Foundation. Its study was based on large employer insurance claims. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)The research also found that when a patient is admitted to the hospital from the emergency room, there’s a higher likelihood of an out-of-network charge. As many as 26% of admissions from the emergency room resulted in a surprise medical bill.”Millions of emergency visits and hospital stays left people with large employer coverage at risk of a surprise bill in 2017,” the authors wrote.The researchers got their data by analyzing large-employer claims from IBM’s MarketScan Research Databases, which include claims for almost 19 million individuals.Surprise medical bills are top of mind for American patients, with 38% reporting they were “very worried” about unexpected medical bills.Surprise bills don’t just come from the emergency room. Often, patients will pick an in-network facility and see a provider who works there but isn’t employed by the hospital. These doctors, from outside staffing firms, can charge out-of-network prices.”It’s kind of a built-in problem,” said Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation and an author of the study. She said most private health insurance plans are built on networks, where patients get the highest value for choosing a doctor in the network. But patients often don’t know whether they are being treated by an out-of-network doctor while in a hospital.Related StoriesStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needChildren’s Colorado granted IAC’s Cardiovascular Catheterization accreditationFeeling safe and good sleep at night matter most to sick kids in hospital”By definition, there are these circumstances where they cannot choose their provider, whether it’s an emergency or it’s [a doctor] who gets brought in and they don’t even meet them face-to-face.”The issue is ripe for a federal solution. Some states have surprise-bill protections in place, but those laws don’t apply to most large-employer plans because the federal government regulates them.”New York and California have very high rates of surprise bills even though they have some of the strongest state statutes,” Pollitz said. “These data show why federal legislation would matter.”Consumers in Texas, New York, Florida, New Jersey and Kansas were the most likely to see a surprise bill, while people in Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Maine and Mississippi saw fewer, according to the study.Legislative solutions are being discussed in the White House and Congress. The leaders of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee introduced a package Wednesday that included a provision to address it. The legislation from HELP sets a benchmark for what out-of-network physicians will be paid, which would be an amount comparable to what the plan is paying other doctors for that service.That bill is set for a committee markup next week.Other remedies are also being offered by different groups of lawmakers. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

New initiative to increase mothers ability to provide milk for very low

first_imgAlthough we were able to show improvement in our process measures and any mother’s milk for the first three weeks of hospitalization, these did not lead to sustained improvement in mother’s milk provision at discharge. While we did not find improvements in our main outcome, we did find several successful initiatives that can inform other hospitals looking to address this issue.”Corresponding author Margaret G. Parker, MD, MPH, a neonatologist at Boston Medical Center and assistant professor of pediatrics at BU School of Medicine Jun 20 2019Researchers at Boston Medical Center initiated a statewide quality improvement imitative to increase mothers’ ability to produce and provide milk for very low birth weight infants at their discharge, as well reduce the racial/ethnic disparities in milk production and provision to these infants.  A new study, published in Pediatrics, indicates that the initiative yielded positive results on improving rates of prenatal human milk education, early milk expression and skin to skin care among mothers of very low birth weight infants during initial hospitalization, but did not lead to sustained improvement in mother’s milk provision at hospital discharge.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CT’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyMother’s milk has many benefits for very low-birth-rate infants, including a reduction of necrotizing enterocolitis (infection of the intestine), sepsis, and chronic lung disease, and improvement in later childhood development. However, mothers of very low birth rate infants that are born prematurely often have challenges making milk. In addition, previous research has shown racial/ethnic disparities in mother’s milk provision at discharge or transfer, with white mothers having a higher rate of mother’s milk provision.The researchers examined three years of data from 1,670 mother-very low birth weight infant pairs from 10 level 3 neonatal intensive care units in Massachusetts. They found that the quality improvement program significantly improved hospital-based breastfeeding support practices, as well as first milk expression within six hours of birth, and any skin-to-skin care in the first month in all racial/ethnic groups. Although the researchers found no racial/ethnic disparities in provision of mother’s milk for the first three weeks of hospitalization, disparities emerged after three weeks. The authors note that, given these results, further research is needed on the effect of factors later in hospitalization on provision of mother’s milk at discharge. This work was supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Source:Boston Medical Centerlast_img read more

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18 Jul
2019

US radio giant iHeartMedia files for bankruptcy

Tribune leaves bankruptcy after 4 years Citation: US radio giant iHeartMedia files for bankruptcy (2018, March 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-radio-giant-iheartmedia-bankruptcy.html Leading US radio company iHeartMedia, which runs some of the country’s most popular Top 40 stations, has filed for bankruptcy protection as it struggles to pay $20 billion in debt. © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Bob Pittman, the chairman and CEO of iHeartMedia, said that the deal would help in “achieving a capital structure that finally matches our impressive operating business” The Texas-based company said in a statement dated Wednesday that it was confident it had enough cash on hand to stay operational and that it had reached understandings to halve its debt.iHeartMedia runs 850 stations including 106.7 Lite FM, a New York soft rock channel which enjoys the highest listener numbers in the United States, and KIIS-FM, the premier Top 40 station in Los Angeles.While traditional radio has been shaken by the rise of streaming, iHeartMedia’s immediate problems stem from a messy process a decade ago for a leveraged buyout, which is when management buys a controlling share of a company with outside help.Buyers led by Bain Capital, the investment firm co-founded by former presidential candidate Mitt Romney, agreed in 2006 to $26.7 billion funded by big banks for the company then known as Clear Channel Communications.But with the global economic crisis soon biting, the banks balked and under a settlement iHeartMedia was saddled with the crushing debt to them.iHeartMedia, which last month missed an interest payment, said in its bankruptcy announcement that it had reached deals with debt holders to clear $10 billion of its burden.Bob Pittman, the chairman and CEO of iHeartMedia, said that the deal would help in “achieving a capital structure that finally matches our impressive operating business.””We have transformed a traditional broadcast radio company into a true 21st century multi-platform, data-driven, digitally focused media and entertainment powerhouse with unparalleled reach,” he said in the statement.iHeartMedia, which has had repeated layoffs since its leveraged buyout, has moved to change with the times including by launching the iHeartRadio streaming service to compete with on-demand platforms such as Spotify.The company has also built a strong presence on social media and on Sunday had its latest iHeartRadio Music Awards, a fan-voted televised gala. read more

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18 Jul
2019

Power to the people electricity finally reaches Indian landmark

Citation: Power to the people: electricity finally reaches Indian landmark (2018, March 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-power-people-electricity-indian-landmark.html Deepa Bhoir used to sit in darkness outside her island home and stare at Mumbai glowing in the distance. Now she stays up late watching soap operas—one of millions of Indians whose lives have been transformed by a drive to get power to every corner of the country. Bhoir and her husband Sasuram are among hundreds of villagers on the UNESCO world heritage-listed island of Elephanta to have had mains electricity installed in their houses for the first time.Local officials hope tourists, who take a short boat ride from the bustle of Mumbai to visit the island’s famed fifth century caves, will now spend more time and money there, boosting local businesses and jobs.”We’ve waited decades for this and we’re so happy. Now I can watch all my favourite shows without any interruptions. The TV is almost always on!” Bhoir tells AFP, grinning.The island is renowned for its temple caves dating back more than 1,500 years and is home to around 1,200 people.But despite living just 10 kilometres (six miles) from India’s financial capital, islanders have spent much of their lives without power.”Lacking electricity was depressing and we faced numerous hardships,” says Sasuram, explaining that he and Deepa would often sleep outside during the summer to try to keep cool.”It was sweltering inside. We would lie and look at the glittering lights of Mumbai and long for electricity to live fuller and more satisfying lives,” the 54-year-old adds. More than 16,000 Indian villages have been electrified since Prime Minister Narendra Modi was elected in 2014, according to government data Lights finally come on for Indian village Explore further Local officials on Elephanta hope tourists, who take a short boat ride from the bustle of Mumbai to visit the island’s famed fifth century caves, will now spend more time and money there, boosting local businesses and jobs Engineers spent three months laying a seven-kilometre (four mile) undersea cable that connects a mainland substation to transformers in each Elephanta village.In brightly painted homes, ceiling fans whirl at high speed as light bulbs illuminate dark rooms struggling to keep out the stifling early summer heat.”It’s been 70 years since India’s independence and we’ve been promised electricity for so long. I’m just glad to see it before I die,” says 69-year-old Bhagwan Tali.Embracing changeElephanta, also known as Gharapuri, meaning “the city of caves” is a world away from Mumbai. Monkeys outnumber humans and there are no cars on the island, just a miniature railway.The only shops are stalls selling snacks and trinkets for tourists.”My business is weak as most cold drinks, ice creams and chocolates can’t be sold,” says 52-year-old shopkeeper Surekha Bhagat, eagerly waiting for her stall to be hooked up to the grid.Elephanta has one school—for children under 16—and there is no hospital, leaving the elderly and sick vulnerable during a medical emergency. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Every week, Tulsa Bhoir makes the one-hour boat trip to Mumbai to buy fresh vegetables, milk and other foodstuffs. The 43-year-old hopes electricity will spur infrastructure.”I’m excited to see how our island changes for the better,” she tells AFP.Devendra Fadnavis—the chief minister of Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital—has said electricity means there is “tremendous scope for tourism” on Elephanta.Every day several thousand people visit the island’s seven caves, which contain ancient Hindu carvings, but leave before the last boat at 5:30 pm and rarely venture into the villages.Officials hope electricity will persuade them to spend the night. Some locals—including Sachin Bhagat, who wants banks and ATMs to open on Elephanta—are already planning to offer their modest houses as homestays.”The villagers aren’t afraid of change but are embracing it,” the 34-year-old says. “We want development so that our lives will become much easier.” A meter was installed in the Bhoirs’ home last month after the Maharashtra state government completed its 250-million-rupee ($3.8-million) electrification project for the island. © 2018 AFP BoredomResidents used kerosene lamps and candles until the late 1980s when they received diesel generators that provided intermittent electricity between 7:00 pm and 10:00 pm every night.They were, however, unreliable and expensive and the limited supply meant the Bhoirs’ two children regularly did their homework by candlelight.Deepa and Sasuram were often unable to charge their phones or other electrical devices. They felt cut off from the world and battled boredom.”We would go to sleep early because there was nothing much to do. But now we stay awake to midnight or 1 am watching our favourite shows. It’s a welcome change,” says Deepa, 43.More than 16,000 Indian villages have been electrified since Prime Minister Narendra Modi was elected in 2014, according to government data. There are still an estimated 33 million households without electricity and Modi wants them all to have power by the end of the year. In brightly painted homes, ceiling fans now whirl at high speed as light bulbs illuminate dark rooms struggling to keep out the stifling early summer heat A couple watch television on Elephanta island near Mumbai, where hundreds of villagers have had mains electricity installed in their houses for the first time read more

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17 Jul
2019

IT raids on TDP MP C M Rameshs houses in AP and

first_imgSHARE Published on income tax Properties of C M Ramesh, Member of Parliament in the Rajya Sabha and Telugu Desam party leader, was raided by Income Tax officials on Friday morning. Search operations were conducted at his houses in Kadapa district, Andhra Pradesh and in Hyderabad. Operations were also conducted at his company’s premises in Hyderabad. Confirming the I-T raids, the MP said it was noting but “a political, vindictive move” by the Modi government as his party left the NDA alliance. “As a TDP Rajya Sabha member and leader, I am also in the forefront fighting for the rights of the people of the State, especially in the matter of setting up a steel plant in my district, Kadapa. That is why I am being targeted,” he said.He said he had nothing to hide or fear and that he would not be cowed down by such intimidation tactics. The MP, presently in New Delhi, said, “The I-T officials have called me and I have told them that I have no objection, but the due procedure should be followed, especially in Telangana.” He said that he had no faith in officials from Telangana and wanted independent witnesses to be present. The TDP MP alleged that the BJP and YSR Congress had secretly joined hands in the state and “during the past few days some of the YSR Congress leaders are openly bragging on Telugu TV channels that my houses would be raided. It is noting but political vendetta.”Ramesh is also a member of the PAC. October 12, 2018center_img COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more

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