5 Sep
2019

High Inflation Economic Slowdown Hits Indian PC Market Sales Decline by 59

first_imgThe overall sale of desktops and laptops in India has gone down in the third quarter of this year as compared to last year, recent data showed.According to market research firm Gartner Inc, India’s mobile PC market, which totalled nearly 2.9 million units in the third quarter of 2012, recorded a fall of 5.9 percent during the corresponding period last year.”Consumers accounted for 47 percent of total PC sales in the third quarter of 2012 compared to 55 percent in the third quarter of 2011,” said Vishal Tripathi, principal research analyst at Gartner.”This emphasises the fact that despite the festive season and availability of various end user schemes on PCs, the market was impacted by high inflation, global economic uncertainty and limited share of wallet as consumers preferred to spend on other consumer durables,” he added.In the third quarter this year, parallel imports and white boxes which accounted up to 47 percent of the whole desktop market showed a decline of 35 percent as compared to the same period of the previous year. Mobile PCs helped drive overall market growth with a similar 23 percent growth on a year-on-year basis. Lenovo retained the top position in the third quarter of 2012 with help of factors like the execution of the Tamil Nadu government order, and a strong increase in the consumer space. While HP’s PC shipment grew around 10 percent, Dell declined 22 percent compared to the third quarter of 2011. For local vendor’s like HCL PC market share declined to 3.4 percent in the third quarter with a 43 percent year-on-year decline from the third quarter in 2011. Acer, Dell, HP and Lenovo represented around 60.6 percent of the market.last_img read more

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3 Sep
2019

Offices open today

first_imgThe government and private offices will open on Wednesday as the three-day public holiday on the occasion of holy Eid-ul-Fitr ended on last Tuesday.Eid-ul-Fitr, one of the biggest religious festivals of Muslims, has been celebrated in the country amid much enthusiasm and religious fervour on Monday.The eid holidays started from 25 to 27 June, while government officers and employees enjoyed their vacation from 23 June to 24 June as the two days were weekly holiday.last_img

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31 Aug
2019

Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources

first_img © 2017 Phys.org More information: H. S. Sugiarto et al. “Social Cooperation and Disharmony in Communities Mediated through Common Pool Resource Exploitation.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.208301 Citation: Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources (2017, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-phase-transitions-rice-farmers-insight.html Study finds mutual reinforcement of phenotypic diversity and cooperation (Phys.org)—The Balinese subak is a self-organized agrarian society on the island of Bali in Indonesia, whose members must share a limited amount of water for irrigation and rice production. Some of the farmers share the water fairly, and some don’t. As in many societies, the members of the Balinese subak are segregated into different communities. , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further The researchers mapped three clusters of subaks to three phases indicated by the analytical curves: cooperation (circles); disharmony (diamonds); and defection (squares). Credit: H. S. Sugiarto et al. ©2017 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Now in a new study, scientists have found that this segregation changes a society’s cooperation dynamics and may help to promote cooperation and fair resource utilization at the societal level. The results have implications for managing natural resources, which is of particular relevance for addressing environmental issues such as curbing pollution, reducing deforestation, and saving endangered species—problems that require widespread cooperation.The researchers, H. S. Sugiarto et al., from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and other institutions, have published their results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the researchers developed a model of social cooperation in self-organized societies that lack central governance, in which individuals are free to choose whether to abide by the rules or not. Their model shows that, as a shared resource becomes more abundant, more individuals may shift from being cooperators (who follow the rules) to being defectors (who violate the rules). At some point, the resource becomes so abundant that all individuals become defectors and social cooperation vanishes.Then the researchers looked at the same scenario, but this time they allowed the society to self-segregate into smaller communities. They found that the downside of the segregation is that it increases the social disharmony throughout the society as a whole. The upside, however, is that the social disharmony within each community becomes very low. In some communities, individuals are more likely to keep cooperating with each other—using the shared resource fairly—compared to the situation without segregation. These results were very similar to what the researchers observed in the segregated society of the Balinese subak.As the researchers explained, the results can be understood in terms of phase transitions. While phase transitions are common in many areas of physics, their role in complex systems, such as human societies, is a newer area of research. In the current study, the shift from cooperators to defectors in a society without segregation as the resource becomes more abundant represents an abrupt phase transition. The researchers explain that segregation “softens” this transition by replacing it with multiple intermediate phases, which arise because some communities are full of cooperators while others are full of defectors. “The greatest significance of our work is in the revelation that stable phases of social and ecological regimes do exist in real-world systems,” coauthor Lock Yue Chew, an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, told Phys.org. “Our work has also developed mechanistic insights that address a vital question in social science through a more fine-grained and realistic application of ideas from physics.”In the future, the researchers plan to investigate how these results can help improve cooperative behavior in the real world, in order to better manage natural resources.”Our results are relevant to applications where the induction of cooperative social behavior is the primary approach to managing the sustainable use of limited natural resources in the context of coupled human-natural systems,” Chew said. “Potential systems of interest include the forest system, fisheries system, and many others, in addition to the rice production system of Bali in our paper.”Building on these results, in an upcoming paper the researchers report on how stress from pest infestation can affect rice growth, and how it can lead to an optimality in the farmers’ payoff. This work is scheduled to appear in the June 2017 issue of PNAS.last_img read more

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