3 Dec
2019

Minor girl gang-raped in Manipur

first_imgA 14-year-old girl was gang-raped allegedly by four youths in the Thanga islet of the Loktak lake on Tuesday, police in Bishnupur district said. A manhunt has been launched for the rapists.During preliminary investigation, the girl said a youth had asked her to visit a spot to talk about the photographs he had taken of her from atop a hill. He had threatened to post the photos on social media.When she visited the spot, the youth along with his three friends whisked her away in a van. She was taken to a secluded place where she was raped and left unconscious. That night she took shelter in a house nearby and later filed a police complaint.Talking about action taken against sexual offenders, Chief Minister N. Biren Singh said that after establishing a fast-track court to deal with crimes against women, 11 convicts had been sentenced to long prison terms. In one case, the rapist had been sentenced to life, while his accomplices had been awarded 20-year jail term.last_img read more

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17 Oct
2019

Quebec Liberal MP resigns a day after Trudeau announces four byelections

first_imgOTTAWA – A Quebec Liberal MP announced Monday he’s quitting politics for family reasons.Denis Lemieux, who has represented the riding of Chicoutimi-Le Fjord since 2015, said he made the decision after careful consideration.He made the announcement in a letter published on his Facebook page.The resignation came a day after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said four byelections will be held Dec. 11 — one each in Newfoundland and Labrador, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Ontario.last_img

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17 Sep
2019

Bahamian man held following police manhunt

first_img Dion Kevin Rigby and Donovan Hanna of Grand Bahama wanted for murder Haitian gov’t official under investigation commits suicide Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Favorite Things – First Female PABX Field Service Tech for Flow TCI Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas July 18, 2017 — One man is now in police custody in connection with Sunday’s fatal shooting. Following the death of the victim Monday morning, Royal Bahamas Police Force launched a nationwide manhunt. The identities of the victim and the man held have not been released. The shooting took place around 10pm on Sunday on Third Street, Coconut Grove. The victim was walking down the street when he was confronted by another male who shot him and got away on foot.#MagneticMediaNews Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedanewslast_img read more

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5 Sep
2019

Gold Prices Could Fall Further over Next 12 Months

first_imgGold prices are expected to see further selling pressure in the coming months due to heightened expectations over interest rate hike by the US central bank, lacklustre safe-haven demand and turbulence in Chinese markets.On Monday, the yellow metal prices crashed to a five-year low due to a heavy sell-off witnessed in the gold exchanges in China.”We think that sentiment towards gold is now excessively negative,” said Capital Economics in a note.A rise in China’s gold reserves also did not underpin the gold prices, as the increased amount was far below the market expectations.”We have been highly negative on gold for the last one year. China’s gold reserves were substantially below expectations and the upside of stock markets has taken the attention of investors there away from gold to equities,” G Chokkalingam, founder of Equinomics Research & Advisory, told NDTV Profit.Chokkalingam expects the gold prices to decline further by 10-15% over the next 12 months.On Friday, China reported that its gold reserves rose to 1,658 tonnes by the end of June, up 57% since April 2009.Besides, the safe-haven demand of gold remained weak in recent weeks despite increased concerns over debt crisis in Greece and a crash in Chinese equity markets.Gold prices did not gain much even though there was a significant sell-off in other asset markets before the debt-ridden Greece got bailed out for the third time last week.The lacklustre performance of the metal during the peak of Greek debt crisis this month had raised concerns over its status as safe-haven.”Gold has failed to benefit as much as we (and others) had anticipated from safe-haven demand, despite the catalysts of the Greek crisis and China’s equity crash,” said Capital Economics.A strengthening dollar in the wake of growing expectations over rate hike by the US Federal Reserve in September is also a big concern for the gold prices in the coming months.”If gold prices fall below $1,050 (an ounce), then there will be more pressure on gold prices. I won’t buy gold right now,” said Jamal Mecklai of Mecklai Financial.last_img read more

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3 Sep
2019

Teenage son kills father

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA man died after being hit with a bamboo stick by his teenage son in Arpara village of Alfadanga upazila in Faridpur district on Tuesday evening.The deceased is Dablu Mia, 46, son of a certain late Hiru Mia of the village, reports UNB.Quoting locals, Alfadanga police station officer-in-charge Nazmul Karim said while returning from the jute field Dablu Mia found his son playing football instead of going to school or helping him in work.An angry Dablu started beating his son with a small stick. The son, however, fought back taking a bamboo stick from a nearby shop. The very first blow on the temple left Dablu critically injured.Locals took him to Upazila Health Complex where the doctor declared him dead.On information, police recovered the body and sent it to Faridpur Medical College Hospital for autopsy, the OC added.The son has gone into hiding, he added.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources

first_img © 2017 Phys.org More information: H. S. Sugiarto et al. “Social Cooperation and Disharmony in Communities Mediated through Common Pool Resource Exploitation.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.208301 Citation: Phase transitions of rice farmers may offer insight into managing natural resources (2017, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-phase-transitions-rice-farmers-insight.html Study finds mutual reinforcement of phenotypic diversity and cooperation (Phys.org)—The Balinese subak is a self-organized agrarian society on the island of Bali in Indonesia, whose members must share a limited amount of water for irrigation and rice production. Some of the farmers share the water fairly, and some don’t. As in many societies, the members of the Balinese subak are segregated into different communities. , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Explore further The researchers mapped three clusters of subaks to three phases indicated by the analytical curves: cooperation (circles); disharmony (diamonds); and defection (squares). Credit: H. S. Sugiarto et al. ©2017 American Physical Society Journal information: Physical Review Letters This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Now in a new study, scientists have found that this segregation changes a society’s cooperation dynamics and may help to promote cooperation and fair resource utilization at the societal level. The results have implications for managing natural resources, which is of particular relevance for addressing environmental issues such as curbing pollution, reducing deforestation, and saving endangered species—problems that require widespread cooperation.The researchers, H. S. Sugiarto et al., from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the National University of Singapore, and other institutions, have published their results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In their study, the researchers developed a model of social cooperation in self-organized societies that lack central governance, in which individuals are free to choose whether to abide by the rules or not. Their model shows that, as a shared resource becomes more abundant, more individuals may shift from being cooperators (who follow the rules) to being defectors (who violate the rules). At some point, the resource becomes so abundant that all individuals become defectors and social cooperation vanishes.Then the researchers looked at the same scenario, but this time they allowed the society to self-segregate into smaller communities. They found that the downside of the segregation is that it increases the social disharmony throughout the society as a whole. The upside, however, is that the social disharmony within each community becomes very low. In some communities, individuals are more likely to keep cooperating with each other—using the shared resource fairly—compared to the situation without segregation. These results were very similar to what the researchers observed in the segregated society of the Balinese subak.As the researchers explained, the results can be understood in terms of phase transitions. While phase transitions are common in many areas of physics, their role in complex systems, such as human societies, is a newer area of research. In the current study, the shift from cooperators to defectors in a society without segregation as the resource becomes more abundant represents an abrupt phase transition. The researchers explain that segregation “softens” this transition by replacing it with multiple intermediate phases, which arise because some communities are full of cooperators while others are full of defectors. “The greatest significance of our work is in the revelation that stable phases of social and ecological regimes do exist in real-world systems,” coauthor Lock Yue Chew, an associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, told Phys.org. “Our work has also developed mechanistic insights that address a vital question in social science through a more fine-grained and realistic application of ideas from physics.”In the future, the researchers plan to investigate how these results can help improve cooperative behavior in the real world, in order to better manage natural resources.”Our results are relevant to applications where the induction of cooperative social behavior is the primary approach to managing the sustainable use of limited natural resources in the context of coupled human-natural systems,” Chew said. “Potential systems of interest include the forest system, fisheries system, and many others, in addition to the rice production system of Bali in our paper.”Building on these results, in an upcoming paper the researchers report on how stress from pest infestation can affect rice growth, and how it can lead to an optimality in the farmers’ payoff. This work is scheduled to appear in the June 2017 issue of PNAS.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Pak lifts moratorium on death penalty after attack

first_imgPrime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Wednesday lifted a self-imposed moratorium on death penalty in terror related cases, a day after ruthless Taliban militants massacred at least 132 students and nine staffers at an army-run school in Peshawar.Prime Minister Sharif told an All Parties Conference here that the moratorium on death penalty has been lifted. “Yesterday’s incident is extremely tragic,” he told the political leaders. “These sacrifices will not go wasted and we all want complete elimination of terrorism from Pakistan.” Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenAn official from the PM office in Islamabad said that the Prime Minister abolished the moratorium on death penalty in terrorism-related cases. A de facto moratorium on civilian executions has been in place in Pakistan since 2008.Sharif had decided to resume moratorium soon after his government took office in June last year but suspended the plan under international pressure.Pakistan is feared to lose a concessionary trade deal with the European Union after resuming hangings. Some 150 countries have abolished the death penalty or no longer carry out executions. Also Read – Pak Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanAccording to the interior ministry estimates more than 8,000 death row prisoners are in Pakistan who have already exhausted all options and would be hanged within weeks if the government allowed the executions. Terrorism has a very broad definition under Pakistani law. About 17,000 cases of “terrorism” are pending in special courts.Justice Project Pakistan released a report saying Wednesday that those convicted of terrorism were often tortured into confessions or denied lawyers, and that recent crackdowns had not stopped militant attacks.A moratorium on the death penalty was imposed in 2008 and only one execution has taken place since then. Taliban attackers shot most students point blank in headMost of the students at the army-run school in Peshawar were shot in the head from point blank range by the ruthless Taliban suicide attackers, in one of the most gruesome attacks against children in recent years. At least 132 students and nine staffers were killed when the attackers wearing para-military Frontier Corps uniforms stormed the Army Public School on Warsak Road and started indiscriminate firing on them on Tuesday. Quoting students, Dawn reported that the attackers scaled the boundary wall from the adjacent graveyard and started firing while moving towards the classrooms and auditorium. “Most of the students have received bullets in the head,” Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa information minister Mushtaq Ahmed Ghani said, giving out chilling account of the attack.The parents, who usually wait outside the school to pick their children at the closing time, were seen crying outside hospitals.Besides the parents and relatives, the people visiting the hospitals were also seen mourning on seeing the bodies and injured students in their blood-stained school uniform. “I saw 17 bodies at the CMH (Combined Military Hospital) and all of them had received bullets in the head,” said an eyewitness. He said that some of the bodies were mutilated. Mohammad Zeeshan, a student of grade-7, said that he and many others were getting first aid training in the school hall when they heard the gunfire. “Our trainer told us to lie down on the floor,” he said, adding that in the meantime the terrorists entered the hall. Zeeshan said the terrorists started shooting the students in their heads at a close range. “They killed our class-fellows and then left us in the main hall. I received a bullet in my foot,” the boy said. Paki begins three-day mourning and mass burials for its childrenPakistan on Wednesday began three days of mourning for the 132 children and nine school staff massacred by the Taliban in the country’s deadliest ever terror attack, as the world united in revulsion. Across the country many schools closed as a mark of respect, while those that opened held special prayers for the 141 killed in Tuesday’s assault on an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar.Schools, colleges, offices and markets were closed across Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, the northwestern province of which Peshawar is the capital.Funerals for the victims, many of whose bodies were pulled from the school still wearing their smart green uniforms drenched in blood, began late on Tuesday and the rest will be carried out on Wednesday.Eyewitnesses said the six attackers came in a white van and torched their vehicle before opening fire to scare away onlookers and clambering over a wall to enter the school.“One of them poured petrol over the vehicle and then set it alight. Then they opened fire in the streets and me along with another person ran away to save our life,” said witness Zabihullah, 12. Two Blasts Outside Girls College Near PeshawarTwo blasts have been heard near a girls college in Pakistan, where 132 children were killed in a massive terror attack by the Taliban at a Peshawar school yesterday. The explosions were reported in Dera Ismail Khan, another city in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province. he security forces rushed to the spot of the incident and cordoned off the area.According to some reports, no militant group has claimed the responsibility of the blasts as of now and no casualty has been reported. The nature of the blasts yet to be established.last_img read more

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31 Aug
2019

Health information on internet may reduce trust in doctors

first_imgLooking up health-related information on the internet can cause parents to not trust the diagnosis made by their child’s doctor, potentially leading to delayed treatment, a new study warns.Researchers from Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine in the US recruited 1,374 parent participants who were presented with a profile of a child who “has had a rash and worsening fever for 3 days.” The participants, who averaged 34 years of age and had at least one child under age 18, were then divided into groups. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the first group, participants received screen shots of internet information describing some symptoms of scarlet fever, an infectious disease linked to strep throat that causes rash and fever.Unless treated with antibiotics, scarlet fever can develop into rheumatic fever and, in some cases, lead to heart damage.The second group of participants received screen shots listing select symptoms of Kawasaki disease, a condition in which blood vessels throughout the body become inflamed. It also is accompanied by fever and rash. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivePrompt treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs is needed to help prevent life-threatening complications such as aneurisms.A third set of parents, the control group, received no internet screen shots. All participants then read that the doctor had diagnosed the child with scarlet fever.Compared to the control group, in which 81.0 per cent of parents reported trusting the physician, 90.5 per cent of parents who had received scarlet fever symptom screen shots reported trusting the physician. Furthermore, fewer parents in the scarlet fever cohort answered that they were likely to seek a second opinion (21.4 per cent), compared to the control group (42.0 per cent).Conversely, only 61.3 per cent of participants who had viewed the screen shots listing rash and fever as symptoms of Kawasaki disease reported trusting the doctors’ diagnosis, and 64.2 per cent reported that they were likely to seek a second opinion.Although there are many advantages of having easily accessible medical information available on the internet, the findings show that “internet-driven interpretation of symptoms” can compromise trust between a doctor and patient, researchers said.”The internet is a powerful information tool, but it is limited by its inability to reason and think,” said Ruth Milanaik, an associate professor at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine.”Simply entering a collection of symptoms in a search engine may not reflect the actual medical situation at hand,” Milanaik said. “These computer-generated diagnoses may mislead patients or parents and cause them to question their doctors’ medical abilities and seek a second opinion, thereby delaying treatment,” she added.last_img read more

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