17 Dec
2019

Miami Trace FFA graduates receive highest award

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This year, the Miami Trace/Great Oaks FFA had 6 graduate FFA members receive the American FFA Degree at the 89th National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Indiana. This degree is bestowed upon a select group of students in recognition of their years of academic and professional excellence. This year there were a total of 3,780 American Degrees awarded. Those that received the American FFA degree from Miami Trace were: Jacob Rose, Natalie Miller, Cassidy Elam, Caleb Penwell, Evan Schaefer, and Heather Johnston.To be eligible, FFA members must have earned and productivity invested $10,000 through a supervised agricultural experience program in which they start, own or hold a professional position in an existing agricultural enterprise. Recipients must also complete 50 hours of community service and demonstrate outstanding leadership abilities and civic involvement. Each of the recipients received a gold American FFA Degree key, certificate and matted frame after being recognized on stage at the convention.One of these members, Evan Schaefer, was further recognized as a 2016 American Star Farmer Finalist.   Production agriculture has been part of Evan Schaefer’s life from the beginning. He says some of his earliest memories are of riding in the tractor with his father and watching his family work the land.  At an early age, Evan knew his future would be in agriculture.  Evan’s enterprises started at the age of nine when he began a plot of sweet corn operated in partnership with his cousins.  From there, Evan’s knowledge of agriculture continued to grow as he gained responsibilities on the family farm.  Today, that excitement regarding agriculture has earned him the honor of being named 2016 American Star Farmer, one of the most prestigious honors awarded to a student by the National FFA Organization.Schaefer began his FFA career with 7.2 acres that was located on his family farm. Evan was then able to grow his operation in 2015 to 695 total acres of diversified crop production. The new acreage was equally divided into corn and soybean production. Evan also continued his sweet corn operation.  This diversity allowed him to experiment with new farming practices and remain innovative on the latest research and technology. Furthering his education at Southern State Community College, Schaefer said he wants to make sure he is doing his part to work towards food security through innovative production practices. Each year at the National FFA Convention & Expo, four FFA members are honored with American Star Awards for outstanding accomplishments in FFA and agricultural education. The American Star Awards, including American Star Farmer, American Star in Agribusiness, American Star in Agricultural Placement and American Star in Agriscience, are presented to FFA members who demonstrate outstanding agricultural skills and competencies through completion of a supervised agricultural experience. A required activity in FFA, an SAE allows students to learn by doing, either by owning and operating an agricultural business, working or serving an internship at an agriculture-based business or conducting an agriculture-based scientific experiment and reporting results.Other requirements to achieve the award include demonstrating top management skills; completing key agricultural education, scholastic and leadership requirements; and earning an American FFA Degree, the organization’s highest level of student accomplishment. Evan Schaefer is the son of Tim and Mary Jo Schaefer. He is a member of the Miami Trace/Great Oaks FFA Chapter, led by advisors, Bruce Bennett, Amanda Swigert and Wendi Mizer-Stachler.Sixteen American Star Award finalists from throughout the U.S. are nominated by a panel of judges who then interview the finalists during the national convention and expo. Four are named winners and receive cash awards totaling $4,000. All American Star finalists receive a $2,000 cash award. The American Star Awards are sponsored by ADM Crop Risk Services, Case IH, Elanco Animal Health, Farm Credit and Syngenta as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.last_img read more

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12 Dec
2019

5 Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families

first_imgA new research brief was recently published by Child Trends, a non-profit research center focused on the well-being of children and youth, summarizing findings from recent research on the risks to young children as a result of changes and challenges inherent in today’s military family life.The following information from Child Trends’ monthly e-newsletter highlights five reasons that we need to be paying special attention to children under age 6. [Reprinted with permission.]Five Risks Facing Young Children in Our Military FamiliesMore than two million children in the U.S. have had a parent deploy to Afghanistan or Iraq. When a parent goes to war – and often for years afterward – families are deeply affected. Young children are especially vulnerable, because they’re physically and emotionally dependent on adults, and because their brain development can be disrupted by high levels of stress. When young children experience high levels of stress and trauma, the effects can continue well after their parents’ military service ends, when their families may have less access to needed supports.In Home Front Alert: The Risks Facing Young Children in Military Families, Child Trends examined the special circumstances characterizing the lives of children under age six in military families. From that research, we offer five reasons why young children in military families might be at risk:Deployment is stressful, even for the non-deployedParents who stay behind may experience depression, anxiety, and loss of financial and social support when their spouse or partner deploys. Getting and maintaining child care and health care (particularly mental health care) may be newly challenging. How well young children do under the circumstances of deployment can depend on how successfully the non-deployed parent (or other caregiver) copes with these burdens.Young children sometimes blame themselvesYoung children have little ability to comprehend the facts surrounding their deployed parent’s absence. They may feel responsible for causing the losses they experience, and develop emotional or behavioral problems. Children’s reactions are greatly influenced by their age: preschoolers may become more “clingy” or otherwise regress in their behavior, and may openly express their fears; toddlers may become more withdrawn or sad, or have more tantrums or sleep problems; babies may become listless or irritable, or stop eating. Among older children with a deployed parent, emotional or behavioral problems, anxiety symptoms, and academic difficulties may occur.Cumulative stress can put children at riskExcessive stress changes brain processes that regulate emotion and behavior, and can have other damaging health effects. The quality of relationships, particularly a young child’s attachment to his or her parents, can either buffer or magnify these negative effects. When stress on the non-deployed parent reaches overload, good parenting can suffer. Children are at greater risk for abuse or neglect when a parent is deployed. Longer deployments and multiple tours may be especially hard on families.The end of deployment can bring new challengesIt can take time for a returning parent to reintegrate into family life. Young children may need time to get reacquainted with a parent who, in some cases, they don’t remember. When returning military members have suffered significant injuries – physical or psychological – young children can react with fear and anxiety. Parental roles and styles of coping and survival adopted during the period of deployment need to be renegotiated. There is an increased risk for domestic violence under these circumstances. About one in six service members returning from deployment in Afghanistan or Iraq returns home with post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries, and other serious mental disorders. This adds to the risks faced by their children and families.The composition of the armed forces has changed, and the system is straining to meet its needsThe composition of America’s armed forces has changed in many ways – more mothers, more single parents, more National Guard and Reserves members. Mothers with minor children now make up about one in six members of the active-duty military. Children in dual-military families (about six percent of the total) can have their home lives completely overturned when the second parent is deployed; temporary caregivers, such as grandparents, may be poorly prepared for these new responsibilities. While the military has a child care system that has been the envy of the civilian world, the system currently strains to meet the need. With increased numbers of parents in the Guard or Reserves (now nearly half of the total force), many families don’t have the supports, formal and informal, that come with living on base. Promising approaches for addressing the needs of today’s military-connected families include home visiting models and better access to mental health services, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for preschoolers affected by trauma. Additionally, school personnel and other service providers would benefit from a deeper understanding of the challenges and strengths associated with military family life. Contributors: David Murphey7/2013, Publication #2013-34Child Trends 5 (monthly e-newsletter) is supported by the The Irving B. Harris Foundation.©2013 Child Trends. May be reprinted with citation.____________________________________________________________For more information:Child Trends Special Report videoResearch brief (8 pages)____________________________________________________________Posted by Kathy Reschke, Child Care Leader at Military Families Learning Network.last_img read more

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27 Nov
2019

Paul George, Russell Westbrook lead Thunder past Bulls

first_imgOklahoma Thunder forward Paul George (13) shoots over Chicago Bulls center Lauri Markkanen (24) in the first half of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Kyle Phillips)OKLAHOMA CITY  — Paul George’s performance late in the first half was all the Oklahoma City Thunder needed against Chicago Bulls.George scored 16 of his game-high 24 points in the final five minutes of the first half and the Thunder rolled to a 121-96 victory over the Bulls on Monday night in a chippy game in which both teams were assessed technical fouls following a second-quarter fracas.ADVERTISEMENT “I did my work early,” George said.George’s scoring outburst came in the final 4:47 of the second quarter as Oklahoma City outscored the Bulls 23-7 and built a 64-44 lead by the break. Outside of that nearly five-minute stretch, he shot 2 of 13 from the floor and scored just one point in the second half.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief“I thought he was unbelievable tonight and he had an incredible first half,” Thunder coach Billy Donovan said of George.The Bulls changed their defensive strategy against George after halftime, leading to fewer opportunities. LATEST STORIES Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “Russell’s been great,” Donovan said. “It speaks to his greatness as a player that he can see what the team needs and from there, facilitate, so to speak. He’s generating shots for Paul (George), he’s generating shots for Steven (Adams). When he and Dennis (Schroder) are out there, they’re both creating.”The Thunder sped into the lead with a 21-3 run that erased a 15-10 deficit. But the Bulls quickly reeled off a 19-8 run of their own and closed the gap to two points.From there, the Thunder took control, building a comfortable lead thanks to George’s 6-for-6 shooting to close to the half.The game was halted for several minutes with 4:27 left in the second quarter after a melee broke out near the Thunder bench when Chicago’s Cameron Payne fouled Terrance Ferguson and, nearly simultaneously, Westbrook and Kris Dunn exchanged pushes.The confrontation ended when Bulls coach Jim Boylen pulled Thunder forward Jerami Grant out of the scuffle by his neck.“I don’t know what really happened to be honest,” Dunn said. “Things just got out of hand.”When it was all said and done — after a several-minute delay for review — Westbrook, Grant, Dunn and Chicago’s Robin Lopez were assessed technical fouls.Lopez wound up in the front row between the bench and the scorer’s table as several people restrained him.“I was just trying to stand up for (Dunn),” he said. “I saw somebody fly in out of the corner of my eye from the other side of the floor. I was just trying to stand up for my point guard right there.“I felt kind of like I got twisted or flipped a little bit. Somehow, I ended up on that bench there. And then, I don’t know. After that, something happened.” Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Donovan said he was as impressed with George’s performance outside of his big scoring stretch as he was with the stint to end the half.“Here he goes crazy on that run in the first half . they elect to trap him in the second half. What does he do? He just facilitates. He gets other guys involved,” Donovan said. “It speaks to his greatness. He could have had a bigger scoring night, but I thought his playmaking, his facilitating and reading the game was really positive for us.”Russell Westbrook had 13 points, 16 rebounds and 11 steals for his 111th career triple-double. Steven Adams added 19 points and Dennis Schroder scored 18 for the Thunder.Lauri Markkanen and Bobby Portis had 16 points apiece to lead Chicago. Markkanen adding 15 rebounds.Westbrook secured the triple-double by threading a pass in the lane to a driving Hamidou Diallo, who finished with a reverse layup as he was knocked to the court and fouled with just over six minutes remaining.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Damian Lillard torches Clippers with 39 in Trail Blazers win PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READ TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ Lopez was ejected less than three minutes later after he picked up another technical foul.Boylen downplayed the scuffle after the game — except as it pertained to the fight he saw from his team.“That’s all we’ve been talking about is fighting for each other and we talk about being a pack of wolves,” Boylen said. “I thought we had some of that. I liked the look in our guys’ eyes when that happened. It bonded them a little bit.”But Boylen said his interactions with Grant weren’t serious, saying that he was just trying to break up the altercation.“It’s really not that big a deal,” Boylen said. “Those things used to happen all the time, now they happen and it’s a major deal.“It’s not that big a deal. Everybody moved on.”Grant said he wasn’t concerned about the opposing coach pulling him out of the fray.“He’s trying to protect his team,” Grant said.TIP-INSBulls: Lauri Markkanen had 16 points and 15 rebounds, his first career 15/15 game. … Jabari Parker, who didn’t play in Saturday’s win over San Antonio after falling out of the rotation, missed the game with a stomach illness. . The Bulls turned the ball over 11 times in the first half. . Robin Lopez’s ejection with two third-quarter technicals was the ninth of his career and the first of this season. SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Thunder: Paul George’s second quarter gave him double-figure scoring in one quarter for the eighth time in seven games. . The Thunder shot 4 of 6 from behind the 3-point arc in the second quarter and outscored Chicago 33-22. . Russell Westbrook and George are Nos. 1 and 2 in the league in steals per game. Westbrook had five Monday, while George added three.THUNDER PICK UP DONOVAN’S OPTIONBefore the game, the Thunder exercised its fifth-year option on the contract of head coach Billy Donovan.Donovan is in his fourth season with Oklahoma City, going 169-106, with playoff appearances in his first three seasons.“I’m grateful, appreciative and thankful for Mr. (Clay) Bennett and Sam (Presti),” Donovan said before the game, referencing the Thunder’s chairman and general manager. “I get a chance to coach a great group of guys. I’ve had incredible support from Sam and the people inside the organization.”UP NEXTBulls: Home against Brooklyn on Wednesday.Thunder: At Sacramento on Wednesday. View commentslast_img read more

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14 Oct
2019

White Bear First Nation has a new water system supplying community with

first_imgLarissa Burnouf APTN National NewsIn September, APTN National News brought you the story of the water crisis in the small southern Saskatchewan community of White Bear First Nation.The water in the community has been undrinkable for more than a decade.Since APTN’s report, things have changed.lburnouf@aptn.calast_img

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