10 Sep
2019

How sleep apnea robs you of a good nights rest

first_img 1 Now playing: Watch this: How to improve sleep using tech 1:04 Comment How to get better sleep in 2019 Tags Causes and risk factors of sleep apneaAn “apnea” is a temporary pause in breathing. In most cases, it’s caused by tissue collapsing in the back of the throat (obstructive sleep apnea). When you fall asleep, the muscles of your upper airway relax. This narrows your airway, making it hard for oxygen to reach your lungs. If you sleep on your back, gravity can exacerbate this narrowing, because your tongue relaxes backward toward your throat. Central sleep apnea is usually linked to other medical conditions, such as heart disorders and brain damage.As far as risk factors, many things can influence your likelihood to develop sleep apnea, the most common and significant being excess body weight. Common risk factors for sleep apnea include:Excess weight: If you have a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher, your risk for sleep apnea increases.Large neck circumference: Your risk for sleep apnea is higher if your neck measures 17 inches or more for men, or 16 inches or more for women. This is because a larger neck has more tissue that’s liable to collapse during sleep. Age: Sleep apnea can affect people of any age, but it becomes more common when people reach young adulthood and middle age. Gender: More men get sleep apnea than women. For women, the risk of sleep apnea increases as they approach and go through menopause. High blood pressure: Hypertension and sleep apnea commonly coexist.Family history: If a family member has sleep apnea, your risk is higher, because sleep apnea can be inherited. Alcohol use: Drinking alcohol before bed can cause your throat muscles to relax even further.Smoking: Smoking can increase inflammation in your airways. POLYSOMNOGRAPHYTo be diagnosed with sleep apnea, you might undergo a polysomnography test. AMELIE-BENOIST / BSIP / Getty Images How do you get diagnosed with sleep apnea?In most cases, doctors diagnose sleep apnea based on a careful physical exam, sleep evaluation and sleep history. You may not be able to provide a sleep history by yourself, but you can enlist the help of someone who shares your bed or room.A sleep evaluation usually involves overnight monitoring at a sleep center, where machines measure your breathing and other body functions, such as your pulse, while you sleep. Sometimes, at-home sleep tests are an option. Tests that detect sleep apnea include:Nocturnal polysomnography: During this test, equipment measures the activity of your heart, lungs and brain, as well as your breathing and movement patterns and blood oxygen levels while you sleep.Multiple Sleep Latency Testing (MSLT): An MSLT tests for excessive daytime sleepiness by measuring how quickly you fall asleep in a quiet environment during the day. It’s often used to diagnose narcolepsy.  Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT): An MWT measures your ability to stay awake during the day by finding your sleep latency, or how long it takes you to fall asleep. Sleep latencies of less than eight minutes during the day are considered abnormal.Home sleep tests: At-home tests are usually simplified versions of nocturnal polysomnography that measure your heart rate, airflow, breathing patterns and blood oxygen levels.In some cases, doctors refer patients to sleep specialist or otolaryngologist (also known as an ear, nose and throat or ENT doctor) for further evaluation, which can include a nasal airflow test and an examination to rule out any blockages in your nose or ears.Your doctor might also refer you to a cardiologist or neurologist to look for causes of central sleep apnea. A neurologist may conduct an electroencephalogram (EEG) to measure brain waves and test for central sleep apnea, while a cardiologist can use an electrocardiogram (ECG) to rule out or confirm any heart complications. Man in his 30s with sleep apnea sleeping using CPAPCPAP masks are one of the most common way to treat sleep apnea. Alina Solovyova-Vincent / Getty Images How to treat sleep apneaYou can treat sleep apnea a few ways, and many people go through a series of trial treatments to find out what works best for their sleep apnea. Sometimes, it takes takes a series of trials to find the best treatment, and most people end up using a combination of common equipment, machines and therapies to get relief. Treatment options for sleep apnea include: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP): Most people who seek treatment for sleep apnea start with CPAP. You choose a CPAP mask, which sends a pressurized airflow through your throat to open your airways while you sleep. If you use a CPAP, make sure to keep it clean. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP):  Similar to a CPAP, a BiPAP also provides a pressurized flow of air. The key difference is that it provides two different streams — one as you breathe in, and one as you breathe out.Chinstrap: Usually used in conjunction with a CPAP, chinstraps help you to stop breathing through your mouth. Oral appliances: If you don’t have severe sleep apnea, you could try custom-fitted oral devices that help keep your airway open. Just make sure to get one from a qualified dentist or orthodontist, not a one-size-fits-all appliance from the internet.Usually, your doctor won’t recommend surgery unless all other options have failed to treat and improve your sleep apnea. Most doctors suggest at least a three-month trial of other options before recommending surgery, which can include nasal reconstruction (such as to fix a deviated septum) or removal of adenoids — the soft tissue in the back of your throat. Symptoms of sleep apneaThe most common symptom of sleep apnea is snoring, but snoring on its own isn’t always indicative of sleep apnea. Snoring followed by silent pauses, gasping or choking sounds is likely a sign of sleep apnea. Because sleep apnea wakes you up frequently throughout the night (even if you don’t notice it), you can suffer from symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as daytime fatigue, difficulty concentrating, unintentional napping and irritability or mood swings. Other symptoms include:Feeling tired, even when you thought you had a full night’s sleepInsomnia or trouble falling asleepHeadaches and migrainesLoss of memory Decreased sex driveNocturia (waking up at night to use the bathroom) Complications of sleep apneaWhen you have sleep apnea, your body is consistently deprived of oxygen throughout the night. This lack of oxygen can have negative long-term effects on your health. Sleep apnea has been associated with:Hypertension (high blood pressure) Cardiovascular disease StrokeDiabetes Depression Metabolic syndrome Liver problems Read more: This one tip will help you sleep better tonight 29 Photos Share your voice Sleep Ghislain & Marie David de Lossy/Getty You know the consequences of not getting enough sleep: mood swings, crabbiness, cravings, difficulty focusing and sluggishness. And when you don’t know why you can’t get enough sleep, the symptoms become even more frustrating. The culprits behind sleepless nights range from blue light to parasites — but you might be dealing with something more serious: sleep apnea.An estimated 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, a sleep disorder that causes you to momentarily stop breathing while you’re asleep. With sleep apnea, your airway becomes blocked when your body relaxes during sleep, limiting your lungs to little air flow.Characterized by loud snoring and often choking noises, sleep apnea causes your brain and body to become oxygen-deprived, often leading to frequent awakenings throughout the night. Depending on the case, it could happen a few times per night or hundreds of times each night.This guide goes over the different types of sleep apnea, causes, risk factors and symptoms to help you understand sleep apnea. You’ll also learn how to go about seeking a diagnosis and treatment options if you think you may have sleep apnea.Read more: What’s the difference between REM and deep sleep?Different types of sleep apneaThere are three types of sleep apnea, and the way they manifest in your body is different. But the end result is the same — all three deprive your body of oxygen.Obstructive sleep apnea is the more common form of sleep apnea that occurs when your throat muscles relax, blocking your lungs from receiving oxygen.Central sleep apnea is less common, and it occurs when your brain doesn’t properly signal the muscles in your body that control breathing.Complex sleep apnea syndrome, also known as treatment-emergent central sleep apnea, is the least common of all three. This occurs when someone exhibits signs of both obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea last_img read more

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3 Sep
2019

Offices open today

first_imgThe government and private offices will open on Wednesday as the three-day public holiday on the occasion of holy Eid-ul-Fitr ended on last Tuesday.Eid-ul-Fitr, one of the biggest religious festivals of Muslims, has been celebrated in the country amid much enthusiasm and religious fervour on Monday.The eid holidays started from 25 to 27 June, while government officers and employees enjoyed their vacation from 23 June to 24 June as the two days were weekly holiday.last_img

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30 Aug
2019

Guess What TimeSaving Apps Dont Really Save You Much Time

first_img The universe has exploded with apps. There are over 1 million available for Apple products and for Android devices: recipe apps, fitness apps, productivity apps, shopping apps. Many claim they will streamline your life and save that most precious commodity: time.But will they? Can they?“So many people are over-busy and overwhelmed. We’re looking for things outside of ourselves to ease our burden,” says Ali Davies, a Vancouver-based personal effectiveness coach who works with clients on time management issues. She almost never recommends a productivity app to a client. In fact, she often recommends the opposite, for several reasons.First, because there are so many of them, many apps focus on something very specific. “There are no barriers to entry,” says Bob O’Donnell, who studies the technology marketplace as founder and chief analyst of TECHnalysis Research. To make a viable product in a crowded eco-system, a developer “wants to have something unique, that sticks out, that focuses on a very specific issue.”Since these niches are, well, small, problems that even popular apps attempt to solve may not be huge issues that devour people’s time. For instance, if you’re in a hotel in a new city, it’s nice to know there’s a good pizza place nearby. But your hotel concierge can tell you that too. A waiter can tell you what entrees other diners have enjoyed. It may be marginally more efficient to look at a shared grocery list compared with calling your spouse to ask if she needs anything, but in most people’s lives, saving two minutes doesn’t help much. You’ll spend those additional two minutes in your inbox. You could spend your life in your inbox. How much more pleasant to call your spouse instead?To be sure, plenty of people do swear by their apps. If you’re in an unfamiliar city, Google Maps is helpful; the hotel concierge can give you directions but isn’t going to tag along in your car. Banking apps that let you take pictures of checks to deposit them save a drive to the branch. If you’re in a store and want to purchase an item, an app that generates coupons can save you money. In the long run, that amounts to saving time as well.While many app-makers aim for niches, others have realized that being all-inclusive is likely more helpful. Journl, a productivity app that originated in the UK, combines list making, calendars, notes, etc., with the goal of getting people out of hybrid systems: a calendar one place, random post-it notes on a desk, lists in a separate app, and so forth. “We’re replacing all that chaos with a bit of clarity and calm,” says Lina Hansson, Journl’s chief marketing officer.This goal of minimizing the total number of apps you use is important for saving time, because even if any one app has benefit, volume produces a cost in clutter and complication. “There are so many of them, how can you possibly keep track of them?” O’Donnell asks. Setting up an app takes time, as does adjusting your life to the app’s process. “If you find one that works for your style, great,” he says, “but that’s tough.”Some people’s styles aren’t technical, which means an app will never be intuitive. “My wife swears by her paper list,” O’Donnell says. I asked which app this “PaperList” was, and he said, “No, I mean putting things on a piece of paper.” People get a smartphone and think “therefore I must have apps, therefore I must use them for everything,” but that’s not true. About 22% of people who download and use any given app once never use it again. Only about half of downloaders will use an app more than four times.Finally here’s the biggest issue with using apps to save time: we are easily distracted. “It’s not always the app itself,” Davies says. “It’s the behavior it triggers.” You go into your to-do list app with the best intentions of crossing something off. But with device in hand, you check email and get sucked into a crisis that doesn’t concern you. Or you pop over to Pinterest and spend the next 45 minutes looking at Halloween costumes. Whatever time saved is dwarfed by that loss.Davies recommends two strategies to her clients. First, “just log where all your time is going.” You might discover that the 20 minutes you spend comparing your stats to a friend’s on a fitness app could have been used to actually exercise.Second, you might try deleting everything that’s not essential. Then see what you choose to add back. Davies did this with everything but a map app. Clients who’ve made a similar choice “have reported the significant amounts of free time they have,” she says. When your phone is less interesting, you look at it less. And, overall, that can make you feel like you have all the time in the world. Register Now » October 24, 2014 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 5 min read This story originally appeared on Fortune Magazine Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

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