26 Jan
2021

Saint Mary’s panel discusses Ferguson aftermath

first_imgA panel discussion Tuesday at Saint Mary’s titled “Understanding Ferguson and its Aftermath” explored the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Mo., and used the incident as a starting point for interdisciplinary dialogue among faculty and students, panelist and professor of communication studies Helen Ho said.“The Ferguson story has become such an enormous and ongoing contentious narrative in the last few months, and it’s something that sets the backdrop for our return to campus, a place for critical discussion and thoughtful deliberation,” Ho said. “Panels like this help can help to provide a space for conversation, as well as a contextualization and synthesis of ideas for those who have been following, or trying to follow, the events.”Cristina Russo | The Observer The panel also included Jamie Wagman, assistant professor of history and gender and women’s studies, and Stacy Davis, associate professor of religious studies and chair of the department of gender and women’s studies. Senior humanistic studies major Clare Maher also participated, panel coordinator and assistant professor of English Ann Marie Alfonso-Forero said.“During the weeks that followed [the shooting of Michael Brown], there was a lot of news coverage of the event and the community grieved … while the police in Ferguson responded to it with tanks and tear gas,” Alfonso-Forero said. “We were talking about how we might address this issue with our students, and we’d feel remiss if we didn’t address this in some way.”The purpose of the panel was to discuss the historical and social contexts of the shooting, the militarization of police in Ferguson and the ongoing protests demanding justice, Wagman said.“We know there was a confrontation between an armed police officer and an unarmed teenager,” she said. “… The community responded with protests. The protest pride became ‘Hands up, don’t shoot.’ Other towns, cities and college campuses held rallies for peace and justice. At times, the media has questioned Brown’s character.”Maher said the increased role of social media in telling and spreading stories like those from Ferguson highlight her generation’s reluctance to use social media as a truly reliable informing medium. She encouraged the audience to use social media for more substantive discussions using credible sources.“In the age of social media, we don’t research why, and context is not something we value,” she said. “Headlines are often the only way we read a newspaper. Social media is not meant to be comprehensive, it’s meant to be social.“Our society is increasingly underinformed. The picture we get from the news media is uninformed. Declaring our personal stance in social media seems significant, [but] you should be moved to look at more than just a Buzzfeed article. Change the narrative, find context. Publish articles in your status.”Davis addressed the subject of militarization, particularly armed police militarization and the perceptions of police in African-American communities.“One of the things that folks have been protesting about in Ferguson is what they have called the militarization of the police force, the use of armored cars,” Davis said. “The police have acted like the military.”“My hope is that what is happening in Ferguson will once again start a conversation about the relationship between law enforcement and civilians,” she said. “At least in black communities, this is just one more unarmed black kid. The hope for us and for anybody is, can we reach a point where these things do not happen? Most of the folks in Ferguson just want to know what happened to one of their own.”Ho said the American public should question why it grows indifferent to these types of tragedies and how the stories are portrayed in the media.“Part of the way some media outlets are discussing this story is that ‘tragedies like this occur all the time,’ and Brown’s death shouldn’t be made a big deal,” she said. “This reaction downplays the real emotions and histories felt by various populations and communities and the real lived experiences that some of us cannot and will not ever be able to fully comprehend.”Beyond media treatment of the story, Ho said Americans should realize the role of government officials in the incident and inform themselves about the deep-seeded issues behind the incident.“We should, as citizens in a democracy, have a right to hold our elected officials accountable and have a say in how we are protected, and by whom,” Ho said. “… It’s easy for outsiders, professional reporters, politicians and others to say things should be fine in a place like Ferguson. But, those who have talked to the residents of Ferguson find a different story, a story about a community whose lived experience is very different.“The fact that this story has resonated for so many around the country illustrates that these feelings and experiences resonate beyond Ferguson. This shared sense of, ‘here we go again,’ is something people should be using to come together to discuss larger contexts of race, representation, media narratives and social justice.” Tags: Ferguson, panel, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

Read More
19 Dec
2020

Legal Roundup:

first_img Legal Roundup: Stetson Wins: Stetson University College of Law’s trial team recently won the regional Association of Trial Lawyers competition in Atlanta. The student trial team of Cameron Croft, Brandon Held, Dennis McCarthy, and Susan Gregory defeated a team from Wake Forest in the final round. Sixteen teams from Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina competed. LSGMI Staff Awards: Marcia K. Cypen was recently honored by Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc., for 30 years of service. Cypen, who has been executive director of LSGMI since 1983, was praised for devoting her professional career to LSGMI, and for her efforts to improve and expand the delivery of legal services to the poor. Other honorees included Margaret F. Zehren, 15 years of service; and Laverne Pinkney, 10 years of service. Jeffrey Hearne received the Alfred Feinberg Memorial Award for his advocacy on behalf of clients, particularly in the area of predatory lending. Lissette Labrousse was recognized for five years of service and Monica Vigues-Pitan received the Blanca Fiallo Memorial Award for her professionalism and dedication to clients. Pictured from the left are Cypen and Darrell Payne, LSGMI president. Community Foundation Appoints Board: The Community Foundation of Broward recently appointed Carlos J. Reyes as chair of its board of directors for 2006. New members of the board also include Linda L. Gill, Raymond Leightman, Albert Miniaci, and Myrtle Potter. The Community Foundation of Broward helps donors become philanthropists by connecting them to causes they care about so they can make a difference through strategic giving. A public organization with more than $60 million in assets, it has allocated $25 million to the community in its 22-year history. Seminar Helps Lawyers Represent the Indigent: The Volusia/Flagler Association for Women Lawyers will present three seminars designed to provide attorneys with the competence and confidence to advise and represent indigent parties in areas of law with which they are unfamiliar. The seminars are particularly directed to public defenders and state attorneys, who would like to do pro bono service in civil matters, but are not sufficiently familiar with civil law practice involving family law, consumer law, housing issues, and problems of the disabled or elderly. Seminar materials will be made available for continuing reference by attorneys who wish to accept pro bono cases or advise at the legal advice clinics offered by Community Legal Services of Mid Florida. The first seminar will address family law issues April 21. The second seminar on May 19 will deal with bankruptcy, foreclosure, and the latest refinance scams. The third seminar on June 9 will cover guardianships and estate planning for low income people, mobile home law, and landlord/tenant issues. All three seminars carry CLE credits. For more information call Suzanne Ronneau at (386) 248-8117 or C. Kim Banister at (386) 255-6573. Upchurch Watson on Mediation: Upchurch Watson White & Max Mediation Group recently hosted a two-day presentation on mediation and arbitration for the Executive Committee’s Volusia/Flagler Chapter, an organization of chief executive officers. Circuit court mediators A. Michelle Jernigan and Michael S. Orfinger discussed how to cut legal costs and reduce delay through use of mediation and arbitration clauses in contracts. Also on the agenda were employment dispute resolution and the effective selection and use of mediators and arbitrators. Legal Roundup: April 15, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

Read More
12 Aug
2020

FPA proposes revisions to Rooney Rule

first_imgby Rob Maadi(AP)–After minority candidates were recently shut out by NFL teams for 15 top jobs, the Fritz Pollard Alliance wants the Rooney Rule to include coordinators, assistant head coaches and club president positions.The proposal sent Jan 22 to league executives came a week after no minorities were hired for eight coaching vacancies and seven general manager openings. There are only four minority head coaches going into the 2013 season, the fewest since 2003.“I think the league recognizes that these are the challenges we are dealing with when it relates to diversity and this is a plan of action that they can accept and be willing to work with,” John Wooten, chairman of the Fritz Pollard Alliance Foundation said. “I feel very comfortable that this will be extended into the Rooney Rule.”Robert Gulliver, the NFL’s executive vice president of human resources, said in a statement last week the hiring results were “disappointing” and anticipated making revisions.In a letter to Gulliver and Jeff Pash, the NFL’s executive vice president and general counsel, the alliance said: “We believe pipeline issues are a part of the reason we’ve seen a reduction in head coaches of color over the past few years, and this expansion will diversify the head coaching pipeline.”With teams trending toward hiring coaches with offensive backgrounds, it’s important for minorities to hold coordinator positions. Baltimore’s Jim Caldwell and Pep Hamilton, hired last week by Indianapolis, are the only minority offensive coordinators in the NFL.Caldwell, who led the Colts to a Super Bowl appearance in his first season in 2009, didn’t even get an interview for a coaching vacancy this offseason.“In this quarterback-dominated era, it seems clubs are increasingly looking for offensive coaches to fill head coaching positions in particular, and far too few minority coaches have been given offensive coordinator and play-calling responsibilities,” said Cyrus Mehri, co-founder and counsel of the FPA. “We want to see a special focus on offensive coordinator and play calling duties going forward. We have many experienced wide receiver and running back position coaches ready to be coordinators now.”Wooten said the Rooney Rule for coordinators wouldn’t apply to just-hired coaches because “it wouldn’t be fair to them” going into their interviews.“We made a differential in that the rule extends to a sitting coach when he starts to hire coordinators and assistant head coaches,” Wooten said. “It wouldn’t be fair to a coach coming in because that’s one of the real positives of a new coach when he’s sitting in that interview is to be able to tell them exactly who his staff will be and who has committed to coming with him.” OVERLOOKED–Baltimore Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell speaks during a news conference at the team’s practice facility in Owings Mills, Md., Jan. 17. The Ravens are scheduled to face the San Francisco 49ers in the 2013 Super Bowl on Feb. 3. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)last_img read more

Read More
2 Aug
2020

FAVORED LIAM THE CHARMER RALLIES TO TAKE $56,000 SANTA ANITA ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY ONE LENGTH UNDER ESPINOZA; TRAINED BY MCCARTHY, HE GETS MILE AND A QUARTER ON TURF IN 1:59.55

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 9, 2017)–Last with three furlongs to run, classy Liam the Charmer rallied five-wide around the far turn en route to a solid one length win in Thursday’s $56,000 Santa Anita allowance feature under Victor Espinoza, as he got a mile and a quarter over a “good” turf in 1:59.55.  Trained by Michael McCarthy, “Liam” had been idle since running fourth as the favorite in a 1 1/16 miles turf allowance at Del Mar on Nov. 19.“We’ve always thought he was a nice colt,” said McCarthy, who saddled the 4-year-old son of Smart Strike to a close fifth place finish two starts back in the Grade III La Jolla Handicap on Aug. 6.  “Victor rode him great, the pace was ideal and the ground had a little ‘give’ to it, which was to his liking.”The 9-5 favorite in a field of nine older horses, Liam the Charmer paid $5.60, $3.80 and $3.00.  Bred by Hall of Fame trainer Ron McAnally and his wife Debbie, he’s owned by Mr. and Mrs. W.K. Warren, Jr.  With the winner’s share of $33,600, he increased his earnings to $94,226 while running his overall record to 7-2-1-1.Like the winner, Beach View, who was ridden by Stewart Elliott, rallied wide from off the pace, finishing a half length in front of Mission Driven.  Originally based in the mid-Atlantic region, Beach View made his Southern California debut at 25-1 and paid $22.00 and $10.00.Off at 5-2 with Flavien Prat, Mission Driven paid $3.00 to show.Fractions, which were set by eventual sixth place finisher Little Scotty, were 23.01, 47.14, 1:11.23 and 1:35.33.First post time for an eight-race card on Friday at Santa Anita is at 1 p.m.  Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

Read More