3 Dec
2019

Model Code of Conduct in full swing in Nagaland

first_imgNagaland Chief Electoral Officer Abhijit Sinha has asked banks to report daily to the district election officer on suspicious withdrawal of cash from the bank account of any individual. If cash exceeding ₹50,000 was found in a vehicle carrying a candidate, his agent or party worker, it would be seized, Mr. Sinha said in a statement. The directives were issued as part of the Model Code of Conduct which is in force in Nagaland in view of the elections to the 60-member Assembly on February 27. Posters, election materials or drugs, liquor, arms or gifts items valued at more than ₹10,000, likely to be used for inducement of electors, or any other illicit articles also found in a vehicle, shall also be seized, the statement said. Mr. Sinha also asked citizens carrying cash more than ₹50,000 to carry relevant documents to substantiate the source and purpose of the money. The Model Code of Conduct, came into force in the state from January 18. In the statement issued on Wednesday, the CEO reiterated the directives issued by the Election Commission on the Model Code of Conduct, electoral offences and election expenditure monitoring. No new government scheme or project should be announced and those already approved, should not be started, if work on it has not yet begun, the statement said. Rest houses, dak bungalows or other guest houses of the government should not be used for carrying out any political activity, the statement said. The CEO said that there should not be any defacement of government property, offices and premises and all wall writings, posters, papers or defacement in any form, hoardings, banners, flags on government property should be immediately removed. Unauthorised political advertisement in the form of wall writings, flag at public spaces like railway station, bus stand, airport, roadways, government buses, electric poles, and municipal or local bodies building, and in private properties should be removed. There is a total ban on the use of official vehicles by any political party, candidate or agent for campaigning, electioneering or election-related travel during elections. The statement said that offering and accepting or receiving of bribe and gratification by any person was both an electoral offence and corrupt practice. Any promotion or attempt to promote feelings of enmity or hatred on the ground of religion, race, caste, community, or language by any candidate or his election agent is an electoral offence and corrupt practice under the law, the statement said. The CEO said any advertisement on political nature has to obtain pre-certification from concerned authorities. He also apprised that Media Certification and Monitoring Committees (MCMC) have been set up at district levels and also at state level.last_img read more

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17 Sep
2019

Complaints Commission takes legal effect August 1

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 15 Jul 2015 – The final institution for protecting good governance will be established officially come August 1, 2015… the Governor has moved to see the Complaints Commissioner in full legal operation in a matter of weeks. Cynthia Astwood had been introduced since last September as the head of this constitutional body.“We are an independent body; as an independent body our decisions are final.”Along with six others, which includes the Integrity Commission, Director of Public Prosecutions, Human Rights Commission and the Supervisor of Elections, the Complaints Commission is a tenant of good governance with the mandate to investigate any action taken by a public body, including: grievances and conflicts in the workplace; performance issues, discrimination; harassment; corruption; maladministration, such as delays, bias, negligence, abuse of power, failing to give reason for a decision, not following through on a commitment and has the powers of a magistrate. When questioned on the necessity of this office, Astwood who had to meet certain qualifications including not being a former member of the House of Assembly explained.“That is there to protect good governance, and to ensure that Public Servants and other persons have other avenues to go to in case they have a concern or they feel they have not been fairly dealt with or an area needs more investigation to be carried out.”In that March interview, Mrs. Astwood added the commission is not set up to fire people from their jobs or functions in government but it is empowered to enter or inspect any Government office; the focus would be more in line with bringing resolution to complaints. While there is a full office set up in Grand Turk, Astwood said a significant goal for her is to establish a Providenciales place where a deputy Complaints Commissioner would take cases from Provo, North and Middle Caicos. There are some limitations for the Commission as explained in a news release from the Governor’s Office: “The Commission cannot investigate complaints about the Governor, Cabinet, House of Assembly, Justices, Magistrates, the Police or Chief Auditors, because separate complaints arrangements are in place.” MPs say they know nothing about pay raise Governor lauds Bien-Aime & Integrity Commission at anti-corruption meeting TCI’s Community College’s Dismercy Lugo wins Integrity Commission’s College Speak Off Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:complaints commission, cynthia astwood, Director of Public Prosecutions, Human Rights Commission and the Supervisor of Elections, integrity commissionlast_img read more

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3 Sep
2019

6 Barisal cops withdrawn over case against UNO

first_imgUpazila Nirbahi Officer (UNO) Gazi Tariq Salman was produced before a Barisal Court on 19 July. Prothom Alo file photoSix policemen who were on duty on the court premises when UNO Gazi Tariq Salman was sent to jail in a defamation case were closed to the District Police Lines on Saturday, reports news agency UNB.Assistant Police Commissioner of Barisal Metropolitan Police Nasir Uddin Mallick said the six police personnel—sub-inspector Nripen Das, assistant sub-inspectors Sachin and Mahabub, and constables Jahangir, Selim and Sujan—were closed for administrative reasons.On 19 July last, a Barisal CMM court sent upazila nirbahi officer Salman to jail after he surrendered before it in compliance with its order and sought bail in a defamation case filed by a local Awami League leader on charge of publishing a ‘distorted’ photo of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in the invitation card issued on the occasion of Independence Day.Salman was granted bail on a bond of Tk 10,000, hours after he landed in jail.As the incident sparked off huge public outcry throughout the country, Awami League suspended plaintiff Obaidullah Saju, religious affairs secretary of Barisal district unit of the party, on Friday for filing the Tk 5-crore defamation case overenthusiastically.last_img read more

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3 Sep
2019

Rohingyas offer special prayers for safe return

first_imgRohingya Muslim refugees offer their Friday prayers at a mosque in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhia district on 23 August 2019. Photo: AFPRohingya imams offered special prayers Friday for a safe return to their homeland ahead of the second anniversary of hundreds of thousands of the minority fleeing Myanmar to Bangladesh.Some 740,000 Rohingya from Myanmar’s Rakhine state escaped in August 2017 a military offensive, joining another 200,000 who had fled earlier persecution.Two years later they remain in vast refugee camps in Bangladesh refusing to go home until Myanmar guarantees their safety and gives them citizenship.The imam at the Khadijatul Kubra mosque in Kutupalong — the largest refugee settlement in the world — prayed to “soften up” the heart of the Myanmar government.”Let us go back home in peace,” Abdul Hakim said.Most of the displaced mostly Muslim minority left their homes clutching only what they could carry.Bangladesh and Myanmar signed a repatriation deal in 2017 but two attempts to start sending people back, in November and then again this week, failed as the refugees refused to go.In addition to security and citizenship guarantees, they also demanded that their fellow Rohingya Muslims held in Internally Displaced Personnel (IDP) camps in Myanmar be released.”We prayed to Allah to get justice for what has happened to us. We would like to go back home. But only when our demands are met. I prayed for that today,” refugee Safiul Alam told AFP.Rohingya Muslim refugees offer their Friday prayers at a mosque in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhia district on 23 August 2019. Photo: AFPThe imam also asked the devotees to join a major rally to be held on Sunday in the camp to mark the second anniversary of their arrival.”We, once again, will peacefully tell the world our demands,” he said.The Rohingya are not recognised as an official minority by Myanmar, which considers them Bengali interlopers despite many families having lived in the country for generations.Rohingya Muslim refugees offer their Friday prayers at a mosque in the Kutupalong refugee camp in Ukhia district on 23 August 2019. Photo: AFPUN investigators say the 2017 violence warrants the prosecution of top generals for “genocide” and the International Criminal Court has started a preliminary probe.”Myanmar has yet to address the systematic persecution and violence against the Rohingya,” Human Rights Watch said Thursday. “So refugees have every reason to fear for their safety if they return.”last_img read more

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