16 Sep
2020

Fast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s 62-57 ACC tournament loss to Miami

first_img Published on March 8, 2017 at 2:19 pm Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossman NEW YORK — In a game Syracuse badly needed as an NCAA Tournament resume booster, it couldn’t come away with a lead in the final minutes against Miami. SU (18-14, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) fell to the Hurricanes (21-10, 10-8), 62-57, and is left to sweat out Selection Sunday in four days.Here’s three reactions to the Orange’s loss in the Barclays Center on Wednesday afternoon.Crunch timeIn the SU’s dramatic wins this season, it’s been able to ditch game-long struggles in the final minutes. While most of those games have been at the Carrier Dome, Syracuse was presented with a similar opportunity in the final three minutes against Miami in the Barclays Center.With a chance to cut the Hurricanes lead to one possession, Tyus Battle slammed an open dunk attempt off the back iron. Ja’Quan Newton came down on the other end of the court to complete the same play to Kamari Murphy and give Miami a five-point lead. But the Hurricanes missed an open layup attempt on its next possession, and John Gillon hit an open 3 to make it a two-point game with about 30 seconds remaining.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter both teams traded baskets again, SU trailed by two again with 12.1 seconds to go. Davon Reed missed the second half of an one-and-one at the free-throw line, giving Syracuse a chance to tie the game with 7.7 seconds left on the clock. Gillon pulled up from 3 at the top of the key, but his shot sailed wide.Battle patted the senior point guard on the back as he leaned over in frustration. There would be no last-second magic for Gillon this time. Pointing downAs we’ve seen all season, Syracuse doesn’t have much of an offense without solid play from its point guards. Specifically, it comes down to Gillon or Frank Howard’s ability to drive the basket. That’s exactly what they didn’t do in the first half, and it cost SU. Neither point guard made a first-half basket, and Gillon, who played the majority of the minutes, compounded his scoreless half with three turnovers and two fouls.The Orange’s offense instead cycled passes around the arc until one of its shooters decided their contested shot was better than the alternatives. SU only saved itself by shooting 52 percent in the first stanza, preserving an eight-point deficit at halftime. A subpar offensive afternoon could have easily put Syracuse down by a significant margin.Gillon didn’t follow through with any drive until five minutes remained in the first half. He tried weaving his way through the Hurricanes defense, only to miss an acrobatic layup attempt he’s tried plenty of times before. The paint didn’t really open up for SU until the latter 10 minutes of the second half, when the Orange entered the bonus. Surprisingly, it was 3-point specialist Andrew White who made the most attempts to get to the rim. He sunk 9-of-10 free throws to make good on Miami’s precarious foul situation.Unfortunately for Syracuse, a shift in offensive strategy came too late.The 6-foot point guard didn’t score his first points of the game about four minutes into the second half, when Tyler Lydon hauled in a rebound and found Gillon open behind the arc. That cut the Orange’s deficit to 38-34.Common enemyIn the Orange’s first game against Miami in January, freshman DJ Vasiljevic made himself known with a career-high 18 points on six 3s. He was the lone offensive bright spot for the Hurricanes in a game remembered for SU’s superb defense. Wednesday’s ACC tournament game wasn’t quite the same defensive showing for either team, but Vasiljevic once again was a thorn for SU.The 6-foot-3 guard made only three of his deep ball attempts en route to a 13-point afternoon, but they swung the game in Miami’s favor at crucial point. His first big strike against the Orange zone came after Battle swung the momentum with a go-ahead 3-pointer midway through the second half. Vasiljevic calmly spotted up behind the arc, answered with a 3-pointer of his own and hit another in the next possession to give Miami a five-point advantage.Even when his 3s didn’t fall, he tested the Orange’s interior defense on the boards. On one occasion, a missed Vasiljevic 3-pointer resulted in Murphy getting fouled around the rim, leading to an 8-0 Miami run after Battle’s 3. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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26 Aug
2020

Six weeks into the season, Dodgers’ Kenley Jansen finds his Opening Day form

first_img Dodgers bench slumping Cody Bellinger for a day Dodgers’ Justin Turner looking rejuvenated on defense LOS ANGELES — Kenley Jansen isn’t back. Not all the way.The Dodgers’ closer hasn’t allowed a run in his last four innings, a season high. He needed only nine pitches to retire Chris Owings, Nick Ahmed and Paul Goldschmidt on Wednesday for his sixth save of the season. The brief, stress-free inning was classic Jansen – a rare sight in 2018.Still, Jansen said, he hasn’t returned to his peak.“It’s getting there,” he said. “I’m not consistent enough. I’m not seeing consistent movement yet, compared to the few years I’ve had before. Sometimes it’s backed up on me.” Dodgers’ hot-hitting Corey Seager leaves game with back injury Whicker: Dustin May yet another example of the Dodgers’ eye for pitching Jansen’s measuring stick is his cut fastball, the pitch he throws 93 percent of the time. It averaged 90 mph in his first regular-season appearance and by Wednesday it averaged 93. Commanding the cutter has been an adventure too.“It’s not quite there yet,” Jansen confessed.Jansen threw 1,242 pitches in 2017, more than any year since 2013. So, before spring training, he and Manager Dave Roberts agreed to delay Jansen’s debut by a few weeks. That debut was pushed back a few more days in early March by a hamstring injury. By the end of camp, Jansen had thrown a career-low 4-2/3 spring training innings against major league competition.By Opening Day, Jansen’s command and speed were suffering. The 0-1 record, two blown saves and 4.02 earned-run average next to his name today were all known risks.“We could’ve been just as aggressive as we were in years past,” Roberts said. “We could’ve done that. There was an injury that took place with his hamstring. That kind of slowed things down. Once that happened, there’s really not a whole lot we could do – we’re just trying to get him healthy, get him ready for the season.center_img Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.“Initially, we should’ve been more aggressive, but that could’ve created more health problems. I don’t know.”Devising the ideal timetable for Jansen was a bit of a guessing game, and the Dodgers won’t know for sure if they guessed right until the end of the season.For now, Jansen said, he’s throwing the way he expects to by Opening Day in a typical year. The past two seasons, he’s been able to add velocity into at least June. If Jansen’s self-assessment is correct, his speed might still improve by another tick or two. He’s confident his command will be better, too.Jansen would rather be optimistic than second-guess what might have been done differently.“I’m not trying to call my organization out or anything because me and Doc had that conversation. We all agreed,” he said. “Maybe I wasn’t ready. I’m almost there, where I want it to be mechanic-wise and all that. It’s not far. Just got to stay positive, keep competing and things are going to go well.”INJURY UPDATESThird baseman Justin Turner faced live pitching at Dodger Stadium in a simulated game setting for the second consecutive day. He faced minor league pitchers James Carter, a right-hander, and Mike Boyle, a left-hander. He even hit Boyle in the leg with a line drive.Related Articles Dodgers’ Dave Roberts says baseball’s unwritten rules ‘have changed, should change’ More importantly, Turner said, he was able to dive to field ground balls to his right and left sides. The left wrist that he fractured in spring training came through unscathed.“That was another box to check,” he said.Roberts said Turner would get a day off Friday before beginning a minor league rehabilitation assignment Saturday. Turner anticipates he will be assigned to Class-A Rancho Cucamonga.He might be joined by infielder Logan Forsythe, who was expected to fly in from the Dodgers’ facility in Glendale, Ariz. Forsythe hasn’t played in any competitive setting since April 14 because of inflammation in his right shoulder.Clayton Kershaw played catch on flat ground for the second consecutive day, extending his range a bit from the 60 feet he threw Wednesday. Roberts said there is no timetable for Kershaw to begin throwing off a mound, in part (at least) by Kershaw’s choice.“He wants little expectation,” Roberts said.ALSORight-hander Matt Harvey will start for the Reds on Friday opposite Dodgers right-hander Kenta Maeda. The Reds acquired Harvey in a trade with the New York Mets for catcher Devin Mesoraco on Tuesday. Harvey went 0-2 with a 7.00 ERA in eight games between the Mets’ rotation and bullpen. … The Reds optioned left-handed pitcher Brandon Finnegan, who was scheduled to start the game, to their Triple-A affiliate. … Outfielder Andrew Toles had a setback in his rehabilitation from a hamstring injury, Roberts said. Toles hasn’t played at Triple-A Oklahoma City since April 13 and his return is not on the immediate horizon.UP NEXTDodgers (RHP Kenta Maeda, 2-2, 4.02 ERA) vs. Cincinnati Reds (RHP Matt Harvey, 0-2, 7.00 ERA), Friday, 7 p.m., SportsNet LA (where available) Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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