18 Nov
2020

Human H5N1 cases reported in China, Thailand

first_imgDec 9, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Two more human cases of H5N1 avian influenza have been confirmed, one in a Chinese woman who has recovered and the other in a 5-year-old Thai boy who died Dec 7, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced today.The cases increase the human toll of the virus over the past 2 years to 137 cases, including 70 deaths, according to the WHO. Exposure to poultry is the suspected cause in both of the latest cases.In China, a 31-year-old female farmer from the northeastern province of Liaoning became ill Oct 30 and was treated for severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress before she recovered, the WHO said, citing the Chinese Ministry of Health. She was discharged from a hospital Nov 29.The woman initially tested negative for the virus, but a microneutralization test for H5N1 antibodies later was positive, the WHO reported. “Using this test, a positive diagnosis is made when antibody levels in a blood sample taken late in illness are at least four times higher than those found in a sample taken early in illness,” the agency said. Antibody tests are reliable but slower than direct tests for viral RNA, the statement said.Investigators have linked the woman’s illness to exposure to sick poultry, the WHO said. Poultry outbreaks of H5N1 flu have occurred in Liaoning province. Contacts of the patient were under medical observation, but all remained healthy and have been released.China now has had five confirmed human cases of H5N1 infection, of which two were fatal.In Thailand, health officials confirmed that avian flu caused the death of a 5-year-old boy from the central province of Nakhonnayok, according to the WHO. The boy fell ill on Nov 25, was hospitalized Dec 5, and died 2 days later.Early results of an investigation suggest the boy might have been infected by contact with dead chickens in his neighborhood, the WHO said. Family and neighbors were placed under observation and have stayed healthy so far.Thailand has had five confirmed human cases this year, with two deaths. The country’s total for the past 2 years is 22 cases with 14 deaths.Other news on avian flu comes from Ukraine, Turkey, Zimbabwe, Vietnam, and Japan.Ukraine’s agriculture minister said H5N1 has been confirmed in the Crimean peninsula, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report today. The minister, Olexandre Baranivsky, said the confirmation came today but gave no details.A health ministry statement earlier today said 17 villages in the Crimea, including some near the central city of Simferopol, have had massive deaths among poultry, according to AFP. Previously the disease had been detected only in the northeast corner of the peninsula.Samples from nine villages had been sent to labs in Britain, Italy, and Russia, the story said.In Turkey, officials have claimed victory over avian flu after testing thousands of birds, according to another AFP report. The country’s agriculture ministry reported to the European Union and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) that the virus has been “completely eradicated.”H5N1 infection was discovered in poultry in Balikesir province on Oct 5. More than 10,000 birds were slaughtered in the area, and about 3,000 birds from Balikesir and around the country have been tested, with no cases found, the story said.However, veterinary experts believe Turkey faces a continued threat of outbreaks because it lies on bird migration routes, according to AFP.Vietnam has been hit by new avian flu outbreaks in two provinces, AFP reported yesterday. An outbreak in Son La province in the north triggered the culling of more than 500 ducks, and 5,000 ducks were destroyed after an outbreak on a farm in the central province of Quang Tri.In Zimbabwe, an H5N2 flu virus has been found on two ostrich farms, according to an AFP report yesterday. H5N2 is a milder strain than H5N1 and is not considered dangerous to humans.The report said Zimbabwe has suspended ostrich and poultry exports and quarantined all ostrich farms. Officials said no poultry outbreaks have been found.An H5N2 outbreak in South Africa last year triggered the killing of 26,000 ostriches, AFP reported.In Japan, evidence of an H5 virus has been found in an area previously hit by H5N2 outbreaks in poultry, AFP reported today. Authorities have ordered the destruction of 19,000 chickens at the site in Ibaraki prefecture near Tokyo.Chickens on the farm tested positive for an antibody indicating previous exposure to an H5 virus, said the report, which cited Kyodo News as its source.See also:Dec 9 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2005_12_09/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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16 Sep
2020

Nicolette Serratore records 1,000th career kill in win over N.C. State

first_imgSunday’s game against North Carolina State started in the same, albeit unconventional, manner it always does for Syracuse outside hitter Nicolette Serratore.The senior waits for her name to be called in the starting lineup and runs past her teammates without giving them so much as a glance, only to turn back towards them and hit a dance move known as “the yeet” to a never failing chorus of laughter and smiles.“At the beginning of the season, we decided that the seniors should do something a little bit special when we’re coming onto the court,” said Serratore while her teammate, outside hitter Santita Ebangwese, sat alongside her trying to conceal a wide grin. “Some of the younger girls decided that was a good thing that I could do… I haven’t perfected it yet.”The popular dance move was far from the only special thing that Serratore was able to do during the four-set Syracuse (18-7, 9-5 ACC) win over NC State (14-12, 3-11 ACC). Serratore tallied the 1,000th kill of her career, a searing cross-court spike that brought the Orange to match point in the decisive fourth game.Syracuse rolled through the first two games, winning both, 25-17, but hit the wall during a Wolf Pack run in the third. NC State picked up momentum after a 5-1 run staked them to a 19-14 lead. With every point, NC State grew more and more confident, letting out triumphant screams that rang throughout the court after every winner. On the other hand, the body language of the Orange deteriorated with each passing play, Syracuse looked as low as they could be until Head Coach Leonid Yelin began to interject.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textYelin, usually a reserved presence during and after points, began to gesture and yell instructions towards his players on the court. Yelin’s additional game management helped the Orange close the gap in the third, but the Orange ultimately dropped the set.“It (was) too late,” said Yelin about his additional effort in the third. “Every time we come into the third game we talk about being as strong as before but it doesn’t work… I’m still trying to figure out what to say.”However, the Orange was able to take control of the fourth set early, thanks to Outside Hitter Silvi Uattara bookending two consecutive service aces from Middle Blocker Leah Levert with kills. The Wolf Pack was unable to recover from the initial 4-1 deficit, and eventually lost the set, 25-16, and the match, 3-1.Coach Yelin was appreciative of his team for “taking care of business” against what he considered to be a lesser opponent, but took a moment to appreciate Serratore’s efforts as well.The outside hitter contributed 11 kills against NC State on Sunday and, according to Yelin, was of immeasurable value to the team over the four years prior.“The record speaks for itself, (without her) we wouldn’t be here, and we wouldn’t have these kinds of players.”Serratore personally had little to say about her 1,000th kill. In her eyes, anybody who plays four years should hope they reach this milestone in all that time. Looking back on the road to that accomplishment, Serratore was more proud of her contribution to Syracuse volleyball than anything else.Rather than personal acclaim, Serratore said that she wants her legacy to be, “Any contribution I have (made) to make my teammates better for the future and just build the program and tradition that I know that Syracuse can have.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 8, 2015 at 6:10 pm Contact Chris: cplucey@syr.edulast_img read more

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