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22 Jul
2019

OnePlus 6T almost makes it to DxOMarks Top 10

first_imgOnePlus always tries to hype its cameras, just like any other smartphone maker these days. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always live up to that hype. It has gotten better for sure, but still fails to get that last mile to make it to the big boys. Considering how similar it is to its predecessor in terms of camera hardware, it shouldn’t be surprising that the OnePlus 6T doesn’t climb too high on DxOMark’s ladder. The improvements, however, prove how even little software tweaks could change the game. The OnePlus 6 and OnePlus 6T share the exact same dual camera hardware. There’s the main 16 megapixel camera with a 1/2.6-inch sensor, f/1.7 lens, and OIS and then there’s the 20 megapixel f/1.7 camera for digital zoom and bokeh. It would probably be unfair to OnePlus if you expect them to perfect exactly the same way. After all, it did invest in improving the camera firmware, and investment that may have just paid off.The OnePlus 6T improves the overall experience especially when it comes to increasing the dynamic range and details, pain points for its predecessor. Unfortunately, it seems that the latter came at the price of also introducing more noise into pictures, plus artifacts and haloing in HDR mode. The same is true in video recording with the additional problem of jerky movement when quickly changing directions.Zoom and Bokeh, enabled by the dual cameras, have also greatly improved but the OnePlus 6T still trips up in the same way. Edge detection, while better than other cameras, can still be a hit or miss. The lack of a dedicated telephoto camera means that digital zoom will definitely be sub par.AdChoices广告The OnePlus 6T’s overall score of 98 ties it with last year’s Google Pixel 2. It’s currently in 11th place on DxOMark’s list, taking into account the other tied spots. Being tied with last year’s flagships may not be that bad, especially when you consider the other things you’re getting for its price. Story TimelineOnePlus 6T Review : Clawing its way to the topOnePlus 6T McLaren Edition announced with 10GB of RAMlast_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

Theres a Canon 8K EOS R coming

first_imgInitial reactions have been solid, though unsurprisingly Canon fans have been quick to submit their wish-lists for what they’d like to see next. At the same time, the camera company’s roadmap is already being worked on. Reports in November suggested a 75MP+ EOS R model was in the pipeline. However aside from just stills, video is a particular focus for the soon-to-grow family of cameras. Yoshiyuki Mizoguchi, Group Executive in the ICB Products Group of Canon’s Image Communication Business, confirmed some details of that in a recent interview with Imaging Resource. “Video will play a huge role in the EOS R System for sure,” the company said. “For example, an 8K video capable camera is already in our EOS R-series roadmap. And we are not just looking at video from a camera perspective, we are also working on how to make RF lenses better for video capture as well.”Those lens improvements could be significant. Canon uses so-called Nano USM actuators, which deliver a smoother, quieter autofocus that’s particularly useful for video. Canon plans to extend the use of that technology, with new lenses in the range. Canon is readying an 8K-capable EOS R camera, one of a number of models the company is planning to add to its mirrorless full-frame range. The EOS R launched back in September, packing a 30.3-megapixel full-frame sensor with ISO range of 100-40,000, along with Canon’s DIGIC 8 image processor with a dual-pixel autofocus. What Canon wouldn’t be drawn on, though, is when exactly we could expect to see the 8K EOS R. Nor, indeed, when the other new models might be released, though it did discuss a rough order that the cameras will arrive in. “We are developing multiple EOS R cameras now but due to varying levels of preferred features we are likely to launch an amateur model next to let a large group of customers step up and enjoy full-frame image quality,” the company confirmed. “Have no doubt that a professional model is coming, but perhaps it may not be the next model we introduce.”It’s fair to say that Canon lagged rivals when it came to embracing mirrorless camera technology. In the same way, it’s also reasonable to point out that the company was slow to add 4K support to its models, too. What seems clear now is that Canon doesn’t intend to make the same mistake again when it comes to 8K. center_img Story TimelineCanon EOS 6D Mark II, Rebel SL2 missed the 4K video boatCanon EOS M50 gives M-Series mirrorless its first 4K cameraCanon EOS R details in a nutshelllast_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

Cummins talks future clean big rig tech including an electric semi with

first_img During the unveiling of AEOS, the first fully electric, zero emission truck, at the Cummins Technology Center on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 in Columbus, Ind. (AJ Mast/AP Images for Cummins) During the unveiling of AEOS, the first fully electric, zero emission truck, at the Cummins Technology Center on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 in Columbus, Ind. (AJ Mast/AP Images for Cummins) Those diverse products include an electric powertrain that would find its way into big rigs from different manufacturers. The demonstrator truck that Cummins has unveiled using its electric drivetrain has a 140 KWh battery rather than the traditional Cummins 12-liter diesel engine under the hood. Cummins says that the weight of these diesel powertrain is about the same as the engine that is removed along with the other component of the combustion powertrain.The demonstrator truck is a tractor day cab configuration and has a gross vehicle weight of 75,000 pounds. In concept form the truck can drive 100 miles on a single charge. That driving range can be extended to 300 miles with additional battery packs. To help the driving range the truck is fitted with regenerative braking and could have solar panels on the trailer roof.The concept truck is also built to be aerodynamic with no side mirrors, the concept uses cameras instead and a streamlined design with sealed truck body and underbody. Electric trucks aren’t all Cummins is looking at for a greener future for the big rig industry. The company also says that it has a near-zero natural gas engine and super efficient diesel engines called the X12 and X15. Cummins has also announced that it has some sort of revolutionary heavy-duty diesel engine due in 2022. Cummins has offered no details on that new diesel engine. While Cummins is looking to a future with electrification and alternative power solutions, it says that diesel engines will be a popular option for years to come. A few days back we talked a bit about the Tesla electric semi that it had been working on. Word is that the electric big rig can go up to 300 miles per charge making it appropriate for regional deliveries. Tesla isn’t the only big name in the big rig industry looking at a cleaner future and electric semi trucks. Cummins, one of the biggest names in diesel engines, is talking up its next generation of “energy diverse products and technology solutions.”center_img During the unveiling of AEOS, the first fully electric, zero emission truck, at the Cummins Technology Center on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 in Columbus, Ind. (AJ Mast/AP Images for Cummins) SOURCE: Cumminslast_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

First Edition July 19 2012

first_imgToday’s headlines include a variety of stories exploring public opinions about the health law, the upcoming election and the Supreme Court. Kaiser Health News: Q & A: Upfront Payment For Medical Problems (Video)Kaiser Health News consumer columnist Michelle Andrews a question about providers requesting advance payment for medical tests and other services (7/18). Watch the video.Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Bill Frist To GOP Governors: Get Cracking On ExchangesNow on Kaiser Health News’ blog, Marilyn Werber Serafini writes: “A former GOP power player is urging Republicans to rethink their rejection of the health law and to implement state insurance exchanges – and to do it now” (Werber Serafini, 7/18). Check out what else is on the blog.NPR: A Majority Of Voters In NPR Poll Favor Amending, Not Repealing, Health Care ActA new poll done for NPR by a bipartisan polling team shows the Affordable Care Act still stirring deep political division in the weeks after the Supreme Court upheld the law’s constitutionality. But while much of the country remains strongly opposed to the law popularly known as Obamacare, a bare majority (51 percent) favors the idea of amending rather than repealing it (Elving, 7/18).The New York Times: Economic Fears Hurting Obama, Poll IndicatesBut the Times/CBS poll nonetheless underscores a national trendline in which the economy remains the dominant force in the campaign, regardless of outside events like the Supreme Court ruling on Mr. Obama’s health care law or the daily sticks-and-stones of the trail (Rutenberg and Connelly, 7/18).Politico: Health-Care Reform: Subcommittee Follows Up On Plan To DefundRepublicans on a House Appropriations subcommittee beat back Democratic efforts Wednesday to protect the health reform law, winning passage of a spending bill that would defund the Affordable Care Act, eliminate a decades-old health research agency and slash the budget for other health programs. The subcommittee approved the Labor-Health and Human Services appropriations bill on a mostly party-line vote of 8-6. The vote came only after Republicans defeated an attempt by one of their own, Rep. Cynthia Lummis (R-Wyo.), to chop an additional $8.6 billion from the bill, cutting it by 5.5 percent across the board (Cheney, 7/18).Los Angeles Times: Bill Frist Calls For GOP To Get Over Opposition To Healthcare LawAs Republicans continue to fight implementation of President Obama’s healthcare law, one former party leader is urging them to get over it and embrace a central pillar of the new law. In an op-ed published Wednesday in “The Week,” a weekly news magazine, former Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a surgeon from Tennessee, said state leaders in both parties should move quickly to establish state-based insurance exchanges where consumers who don’t get insurance through an employer will be able to shop for health insurance plans (Levey, 7/18).The New York Times: Maine Debate Hints At Rift On Medicaid After RulingAs some Republican governors declare that they will not expand Medicaid under the national health care law, Gov. Paul R. LePage is going a step further. In what could lead to a direct confrontation with the Obama administration, he is planning to cut thousands of people from Maine’s Medicaid rolls, arguing that the recent Supreme Court ruling on the law gives him license to do so (Goodnough and Pear, 7/18).Los Angeles Times: Survey: Medicare Patients Happier Than Those With Private CoverageElderly Americans on Medicare are substantially happier with their insurance coverage than their younger counterparts who rely on commercial insurance, according to a new national survey. Only 8% of Medicare beneficiaries 65 or over rated their coverage “fair” or “poor,” the nonprofit Commonwealth Fund found (Levey, 7/18).The New York Times: Postal Service Set To Default On Billions In Health Fund PaymentsThe Postal Service, faced with continuing financial losses because of a drop in mail volume, expects to default for the first time on its annual payment for future retiree health benefits (Nixon, 7/18).The Wall Street Journal: Post Office Might Miss Retirees’ PaymentThe Postal Service repeated on Wednesday that without congressional action, it will default—a first in its long history, a spokesman said—on a legally required annual $5.5 billion payment, due Aug. 1, into a health-benefits fund for future retirees. Action in Congress isn’t likely, as the House prepares to leave for its August recess (Levitz, 7/18).The New York Times: Campaign Memo: Philosophic Clash Over Government’s Role Highlights Parties’ DivideAt its core, the president’s argument is that the every-man-for-himself ethos he attributes to his opponents does not work. Instead, he advances a we’re-in-this-together creed born out of his days as a community activist. … Mr. Romney, for his part, has also been a believer in activist government at times, certainly when he was governor of Massachusetts and enacted a pioneering plan to expand health care coverage. But the lifelong entrepreneur in him hears words like Mr. Obama’s as a repudiation of the storied American tradition of rugged individualism and the self-made man (Baker, 7/18).The Associated Press/Washington Post: In Florida For 2-Day Campaign Swing, Obama Tries To Keep Pressure On RomneyObama is expected to make a pitch to seniors in West Palm Beach, where he’ll visit Century Village, a condominium complex home to thousands of retirees, long a bastion of reliable Democratic voters. Obama and Democrats have warned that Romney would seek to implement a budget plan authored by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., that includes an overhaul of Medicare that would change it into a voucher-like program for those who retire in 10 years (7/19).Politico: Biden: Obama Knew Health Care Would Cost HimVice President Biden said Wednesday that President Obama was fully aware of the political backlash that passing health care reform would cause — but did it anyway. “Every single time he’s made a decision — and I’m not exaggerating to you — he sits there, knows the pain it’s gonna cost him politically,” Biden said on a call with Obama campaign volunteers (Tau, 7/18).The New York Times: Public’s Opinion Of Supreme Court Drops After Health Care Law DecisionThe American public’s satisfaction with the Supreme Court, which had already been low by historical standards in recent polls, dropped further in the wake of the court’s 5-to-4 ruling last month upholding President Obama’s health care overhaul law (Liptak and Kopicki, 7/18).The Associated Press/Washington Post: Feuding With Roberts Over Health Care Decision? Not Me, Says ScaliaJustice Antonin Scalia said Wednesday he hasn’t had a “falling out” with Chief Justice John Roberts over the Supreme Court’s landmark 5-4 decision validating much of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul (7/18).USA Today’s The Oval: Scalia: No ‘Falling Out’ With Roberts After Obamacare RulingScalia’s comments came in an interview with CNN’s Piers Morgan that aired last night and just three weeks after Roberts sided with the more liberal jurists on the Supreme Court to uphold President Obama’s landmark health care reform law (Madhani, 7/19).Politico: Scalia Says He’s Not Feuding With RobertsJustice Antonin Scalia is shedding little light on the Supreme Court’s deliberations over President Barack Obama’s health care law, but the court’s longest-serving justice did deny in an interview aired Wednesday night that he had a “falling out” with Chief Justice John Roberts over his decision to join with the court’s liberal members to uphold a central part of the law (Gerstein, 7/19). Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. First Edition: July 19, 2012last_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

How The Medicaid Expansion Is Playing In Certain States

first_imgIn New Jersey, advocates are making a case for the state to pursue this part of the health law, but  Wisconsin’s governor is pointing to its complexity as an argument against it. The Washington state legislature is also giving an expansion a long look.The Wall Street Journal: Questions Remain On Expanded MedicaidAdvocates for the poor are making their case that New Jersey should expand the ranks of people eligible for Medicaid in what could be the next big decision on how the federal health insurance overhaul plays out in New Jersey. They say it will save state taxpayers money and give far more low-income people health coverage. But doctors are apprehensive, and hospitals aren’t pushing hard for the change, which some anti-big-government groups oppose deeply (1/28).Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: State Could Save Money By Not Expanding Medicaid ProgramThe complexity of the Affordable Care Act could give Gov. Scott Walker a strong incentive to not expand the state’s Medicaid program. Under one scenario, not expanding the program would save the state money immediately and even more money in future years. But it would leave tens of thousands of people in the state ineligible for coverage. And because of a quirk in the law, it could increase costs for some Wisconsin businesses. Not expanding the Medicaid program would give the state the option of not covering adults with household incomes above 100% of the federal poverty threshold – $23,050 for a family of four this year. Instead, they would be eligible for federal subsidies to buy commercial health insurance through online marketplaces known as exchanges. In contrast, only adults with incomes above 138% of the federal poverty level would be eligible for federal subsidies to buy insurance if the state expands its Medicaid program (Boulton, 1/26). Seattle Times: State Legislators Study Expanding MedicaidWashington state officials are moving ahead quickly to set up a new health-insurance marketplace where the uninsured can start buying health plans later this year. But one other major element of Obamacare — the expansion of Medicaid to cover more of the state’s poorest people — is getting a close look in the Legislature (Shannon, 1/27). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. How The Medicaid Expansion Is Playing In Certain Stateslast_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

UnitedHealth Subsidiary Helps Hospitals Get More From Medicare

first_imgUnitedHealth Subsidiary Helps Hospitals Get More From Medicare The company, Executive Health Resources, is often at the center of battles between hospitals and Medicare over how the facilities bill, reports The New York Times. Meanwhile, more health providers are participating in Medicare’s experiments with bundled payments. The New York Times: UnitedHealth, An Insurer Switching Roles, Helps Hospitals On Medicare BillingTo hospitals, billions of dollars depend on how they define a patient’s stay. Even though a patient may be in the hospital for a simple surgery, Medicare might classify the procedure as outpatient care and pay a lower fee to the hospital. … UnitedHealth also owns a little-known consultant that is flourishing by helping hospitals exploit what they describe as a gray area in Medicare payments for hospital stays, fighting to get what can amount to thousands of dollars more per patient. The consultant, Executive Health Resources, is often at the center of battles between hospitals and Medicare over how the facilities bill (Abelson, 6/30).Modern Healthcare:  CMS To Expand Bundle Payment Initiative More hospitals, nursing homes and healthcare providers are poised to join Medicare’s ambitious test of bundled payments, and the expansion underscores federal policymakers’ eagerness to accelerate reforms in healthcare financing — even ahead of evidence that new models will succeed (Evans, 6/30).  This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

State Highlights Mass Lawmakers Again Focus On Curbing Health Care Costs Minn

first_img Sacramento Bee: Audit: Backlog Of Complaints Over California Nurses Threatens Care  Iowa’s largest health insurance carrier has denied claims from new mothers who want breastfeeding support from private trained specialists, despite a federal law that requires insurers to provide the coverage, according to a lawsuit filed on behalf of two Iowa women. Breastfeeding counseling, support and supplies are among the preventive health services that insurers are supposed to cover at no cost to policyholders under the Affordable Care Act, as long as the service is done by a provider within an insurance company’s network. But Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield has worked around the law by failing to build a list of professionals in its network who specialize in breastfeeding care, forcing women to pay out-of-pocket for the services, according to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court. (Rodgers, 12/13) A task force chaired by Lt. Gov. Jeff Colyer to address problems in rural health care determined that expanding telemedicine, addressing workforce shortages and giving providers more flexibility were key to Kansas’ future. The Rural Health Working Group wrapped up a year of meetings Tuesday and is now compiling a set of recommendations to present to the Legislature ahead of the session that begins Jan. 9. Those recommendations will not include expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act — something rural hospital officials say would help their bottom line, but Colyer and other conservative Republicans say is a nonstarter. (Marso, 12/13) The Star Tribune: Report Takes Deep Dive Into Minnesota Health Clinic Costs As marijuana becomes legal in Massachusetts, most of us have lots of questions about how it will work. We asked you to tell us what you’d like to know about the new law, and we got a slew of queries. (Bebinger, 12/14) Kansas Health Institute: Rural Health Group Wraps Up With Focus On Telemedicine, Workforce Issues  A new report from a Minnesota nonprofit is shedding light on why some medical clinics are more expensive than others — determining which ones simply charge higher prices, and which order more services such as tests, follow-up visits and prescriptions. Identifying expensive clinics is important in an era of rising health care costs because it allows patients to be better shoppers, said Jim Chase, executive director of Minnesota Community Measurement, a nonprofit agency that analyzes claims data from the state’s largest health plans. (Olson, 12/13) San Jose Mercury News: California Auditor Blasts State Nursing Board For Investigation Delays This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Virginia Hospital & Healthcare Association officials are proposing the General Assembly approve the creation of a more detailed registry for behavioral health beds and other measures they say would improve mental health care. The association’s leaders introduced a four-part plan Tuesday aimed at addressing significant problems in the mental health system. The General Assembly convenes next month. (Kleiner, 12/13) The California board charged with resolving complaints against registered nurses has such a huge backlog that some active caregivers may pose a risk to patient safety, according to a new audit. The review of the Board of Registered Nursing’s enforcement program found that of the 40 complaints resolved between Jan. 1, 2013, and June 30, 2016, the board failed to complete 31 within its 18-month goal – and 15 of the complaints took longer than three years. Of those 15 complaints, the board took longer than four years to resolve seven, “six of which included allegations of patient harm resulting from a nurse’s actions.” (Cadelago, 12/13) KQED Future of You: New HIV Studies Offer Fresh Hope For A Cure  A new federal program pledges to invest more than $6 billion to promote cutting-edge healthcare initiatives, including research on cancer and brain disorders, and improve access to treatments for mental health and substance use disorders. And New Jersey, with its established pharmaceutical industry, is well positioned to benefit from the new law, observers suggested. On Tuesday President Barack Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act, which he said will promote “medical breakthroughs” and help address some of the nation’s most pressing healthcare challenges, including addiction, cancer and mental illness. It also seeks to address what experts have described for decades as a lack of sufficient funding for scientific research and growing competition for the dollars that remain. (Stainton, 12/14) Des Moines Register: Lawsuit: Wellmark Skirting Law To Deny Breastfeeding Claims State Highlights: Mass. Lawmakers Again Focus On Curbing Health Care Costs; Minn. Report Examines Why Some Clinics Are Pricier Than Others Outlets report on health news from Massachusetts, Minnesota, Kansas, California, New Jersey, Virginia, Iowa and Georgia. San Jose Mercury News: Santa Clara County Unveils ‘Pay For Success’ Mental Health Plan center_img Richmond Times Dispatch: Virginia Hospital Association Plans To Push For Better Registry For Mental Health Beds, Easier Screening Process  More than a year ago, Santa Clara County embarked on its first “Pay for Success” project — a partnership geared toward permanently sheltering chronically homeless people — and Tuesday officials approved a similar plan to help those with severe mental disorders. “Partners in Wellness” is a plan aimed at getting 250 mentally ill people who use county services into more intensive outpatient care. The goal is to actually save money in the long-term by helping mentally ill people stay out of emergency rooms and jails. (Kurchi, 12/13) Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Survivor: Hospital Believed Doctor Instead Of Victims In a blistering report issued Tuesday, the California state auditor warned the Board of Registered Nursing that its delays in resolving complaints against nurses accused of negligence involving patient injury or death pose a serious threat to others. Among the cases cited in the audit was a complaint alleging that a nurse caused a toddler’s death by administering the wrong dose of medication. (Seipel, 12/13) The HIV research community is increasingly optimistic about the promising “shock and kill” approach to eradicating HIV from infected patients. Such removal of all traces of the virus from an individual’s body would represent an actual cure for AIDS. (d’Adesky, 12/13) Members of Virginia’s congressional delegation split sharply on how to pay for a major infrastructure bill and how to reform health care during a discussion Monday about what could be possible with Donald Trump as president. Rep. Barbara Comstock (R) and Rep. Gerry Connolly (D) engaged in some heated exchanges, but found common ground on defense funding — an area that knows no partisan divide in the military-heavy state. (Portnoy, 12/13) The Star Tribune: Patients Sue St. Cloud Cancer Center, Alleging Negligent Radiation Therapy WBUR: You Asked, We Answered: Here’s What You Wanted To Know About Recreational Marijuana  Shanta Hereford can’t shake the memory, try as she might. Bend over and touch your toes, she remembers the doctor saying, before his hands went where she was certain they didn’t belong.Even now, a dozen years and hundreds of miles removed from that day at a clinic in Wisconsin’s capital city, she says she still gets nervous when she needs medical attention…Hereford was one of four Wisconsin women whose complaints of sexual misconduct led that state’s medical board to discipline Dr. Frank Salvi, a prominent spine specialist affiliated with the University of Wisconsin hospital system, in 2009. (Robins, 12/13) Massachusetts Senate leaders said Tuesday that they want to draft new legislation to tackle rising health costs, conceding that current efforts have not done enough. The state passed a law in 2012 aimed at curbing medical spending, but Senate majority leader Harriette Chandler told reporters that it “obviously isn’t successful if we’re [still] looking for ways to contain these costs.” (Dayal McCluskey, 12/14) Boston Globe: Mass. Senate Leaders Plan Another Run At Curbing Health Care Costs  [Sandy] Schwegman, 76, and six other patients at Coborn Cancer Center in St. Cloud filed lawsuits for botched therapy plans that left them under- or over-radiated and potentially at increased risk of cancer recurrence. The total number of lawsuits is expected to grow to 17 by the end of the year. (Chanen, 12/13) The Washington Post: Health Care, Funding An Infrastructure Bill Divide Virginia Members Of Congress NJ Spotlight: NJ Poised To Benefit From Major Federal Funding For Healthcare Innovation last_img read more

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22 Jul
2019

Smaller Hospitals Form Groups To Expand Participation In Profitable Drug Trials

first_img Georgia Health News: Northside Suffers Another Legal Setback In Fight Over Its Records Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts will announce Tuesday that it is developing a program to pay hospitals not for every patient they admit and every procedure they do, but for how well they control costs while helping to keep patients healthy. Hospitals would be rewarded when they collaborate with physician groups — even physicians affiliated with a different hospital — to manage costs and improve patient outcomes. (Dayal McCluskey, 10/29) Northside Hospital has lost another round in court in its long-running open records fight. But the case still may have more time to run before a final resolution. The new ruling comes almost a year after the Georgia Supreme Court reversed lower court decisions that barred access to Northside’s financial records, and sent the case back to the original trial court. (Miller, 10/29) As suicide rates among veterans remain high, the Wounded Warrior Project has committed to expanding its mental health care services to reach about 5,000 additional veterans across the nation over the next five years. …The network, which was launched in 2016, sponsors veterans through an intensive, two- to three-week program to help them cope with post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury at one of four academic medical centers: UCLA Health in California, Emory Healthcare in Georgia, Rush University Medical Center in Illinois and Massachusetts General Hospital. (Balch, 10/29) Less than a week after NBC host Megyn Kelly was fired for defending blackface on her morning show, a photo of a Kansas City couple in blackface started circulating on Facebook. A user took a screenshot of Shelbi Elliott-Heenan’s Facebook post — a photo of herself and a man in blackface, dressed as Beyonce and Jay-Z. Elliott-Heenan is a registered nurse at St. Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City. (Tudhope, 10/29) Richmond Times-Dispatch: Wounded Warrior Project Expands Mental Health Care Services For Veterans Smaller Hospitals Form Groups To Expand Participation In Profitable Drug Trials By working as a single unit, these hospitals hope to improve chances of competing with urban medical centers for clinical trials. Drugmakers are constantly searching for patients for clinical trials and pay hospitals as much as $10,000 per patient. Hospital news also comes out of Georgia, Massachusetts, Florida and Missouri.center_img KCUR: Hospital Investigation Underway After Kansas City Nurse Dresses In Blackface  Small hospitals need money. Drug companies need patients for tests. Both sides say they’ve found a solution. Regional hospitals across the U.S. are banding together to make it easier for pharmaceutical companies to use their facilities for clinical trials, a strategy that could boost revenue and give drugmakers increased access to patients. (Hopkins, 10/29) Boston Globe: Blue Cross Wants To Reward Hospitals — For Keeping Patients Out Of Hospitals Bloomberg: Lucrative Drug Trials Prompt Regional Hospitals To Join Forces  This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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21 Jul
2019

Tesla Autonomous Possibilities Flick Is Inspiring

first_img“You gave me hope to keep exploring”Here we have a beautiful short movie from Troy Nikolic about the endless possibilities to influence lives with autonomous driving.Currently, we are not yet able to drive autonomously, but the first such cars should be able to within several years and it really could change peoples lives and open the world for them.See Also The video includes Tesla as an example vehicle that could take a passenger for a ride as Tesla, with its advanced driver assist system – Tesla Autopilot – is seen as a pioneer for the upcoming full self-driving cars.“I wrote and directed this branded short to showcase the potential of autonomous driving vehicles. I believe in the future of autonomous driving and if I can show people, even for one second, that there may be some inspiring or practical uses of the technology, then that’s wonderful.I hope you enjoy what I and some very talented friends/ creators made with this short film.” Autonomous Chevy Bolt Program Gets Billions In Backing Source: Electric Vehicle News Watch As China’s First Electric, Fully Self-Driving Taxis Hit the Road Tesla Calls On Employees To Test Full Self-Driving Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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21 Jul
2019

PlugIn Hybrids No Longer Banned From Beverly Hills Charging Stations

first_imgAt the time of the announcement, the city explained their decision:In order to improve access for vehicles that are 100% reliant on electric power, the new policy reserves the City’s EV charging stations for battery-only electric vehicles. All other vehicles (including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) and any vehicle without an active charging session or not connected to a station may be subject to citation and/or towing at the owner’s expense.Certainly, the decision to tow or fine a vehicle that is not actively charging is both reasonable and necessary. However, the decision to restrict plug-in hybrids like the Honda Clarity PHEV or Chevy Volt was met with a mixed response.State Senator Ricardo Lara authored a bill to combat the local initiative. All public charging stations funded by the state or ratepayers must be accessible to all plug-in vehicle types. SB 1000 states:A city, county, or city and county shall not restrict which types of electric vehicles, including, but not limited to, plug-in hybrid vehicles, may access an electric vehicle charging station approved for passenger vehicles that both is publicly accessible and the construction of which was funded, at least in part, by the state or through moneys collected from ratepayers.Thankfully for PHEV owners, the state bill passed. In order to comply, the Beverly Hills City Council has removed PHEV restrictions as of January 1, 2019.Source: Green Car Reports, Plug In Sites New state law requires Beverly Hills City Council to walk back PHEV restrictions.In April of last year, the city of Beverly Hills, California put into effect new restrictions on 35 public charging stations at city parking facilities. In addition to new enforcement regulations and charge fees, Beverly Hills restricted Plug-in hybrid vehicles from using the stations. Only battery electric vehicles would have access moving forward.More About EV Charging Tesla Model X Tows Gas Truck Away From Supercharger: Video Source: Electric Vehicle News Electrify America Launches California’s First 350 kW Charging Stations Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 8, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Electrify America Signs Deal For “Interoperable” EV Charginglast_img read more

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